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So today's exercise is to create a function to initialize an array of int and fill it from 0 to n.

I wrote this :

void        function(int **array, int max)
{
    int i = 0;
    *array = (int *) malloc((max + 1) * sizeof(int));
    while (i++ < max)
    {
        *array[i - 1] = i - 1; // And get EXC_BAD_ACCESS here after i = 2
    }
}

After a few hours of EXC_BAD_ACCESS I was getting crazy I decided to search on SO, find this question : Initialize array in function Then changed my function to :

void        function(int **array, int max)
{
    int *ptr; // Create pointer
    int i = 0;
    ptr = (int *) malloc((max + 1) * sizeof(int)); // Changed to malloc to the fresh ptr
    *array = ptr; // assign the ptr
    while (i++ < max)
    {
        ptr[i - 1] = i - 1; // Use the ptr instead of *array and now it works
    }
}

And now it works ! But it's not enough to have it working, I would really like to know why my first approach didn't work ! To me they look the same !

PS : just in case this is the main I use :

int main() {
    int *ptr = NULL;
    function(&ptr, 9);
    while (*ptr++) {
        printf("%d", *(ptr - 1));
    }
}
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Please mark it as answered –  Coffee_lover Jul 24 '13 at 16:04
    
I can't yet ! Don't worry Ill do it as soon as I can : 9 more mins –  ItsASecret Jul 24 '13 at 16:05
    
My bad!...I am sorry! –  Coffee_lover Jul 24 '13 at 16:05
    
@ItsASecret I would also suggest not using null-terminated array for integers. It can easily lead to runtime errors –  Taylor Flores Jul 24 '13 at 16:13
    
Where do you see it being null terminated :/ ? –  ItsASecret Jul 24 '13 at 16:38
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You have the wrong precedence,

*array[i - 1] = i - 1;

should be

(*array)[i - 1] = i - 1;

Without the parentheses, you access

*(array[i-1])

or array[i-1][0], which is not allocated for i > 1.

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Ok I never would have found that, thank you very much! –  ItsASecret Jul 24 '13 at 16:03
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