Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does it make any difference in having a 32 or 64 bit CPU in the amount of precision that IEEE 754 provides? I mean if when programming in C the size of floats, doubles and long doubles is different between a 32 or 64 bit CPU.

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, there is no difference, you can confirm this by checking sizeof(float) across both architectures. If you need greater precision use double.

share|improve this answer
    
So does not offer any advantage to C programmers of mathematics applications a 64bit CPU? –  Janus Gowda Jul 24 '13 at 16:28
1  
Do not quote me on this, but double performance on 64bit should be faster then 32bit depending on what you are doing since a double value is 64 bits long. It also depends on the FPU. –  Geoffrey Jul 24 '13 at 16:31
1  
64-bit means a wider (faster) bus. So there would be some speed up there. 64-bit FPU would also process doubles better. –  Jim Jul 24 '13 at 16:31
add comment

except in some microcontrollers where doubles may be 32 bit same as floats. In most other architectures floats and doubles are exact 32 and 64 bits respectively, so the precision is the same whether you're on a 32 or 64 bit computer. But if you're doing a lot of maths, x86_64 would be benefit because of the double number of registers, SSE2 available default, less load/operations in 64 bits...

share|improve this answer
add comment

Assuming float and double map to IEEE-754 single-precision and double-precision numbers respectively, then no, there is no difference.

long double may be a different story, however, since compilers may choose to pad it to an even size.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It is common to most 32-bit and 64-bit machines for float to be IEEE-754 32-bit floating point, and double to be IEEE-754 64-bit floating point. Some implementations might use the IEEE-754 80-bit type as double (or long double).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.