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I want to concatenate two strings in such a way, that after the first character of the first string, the first character of second string comes, and then the second character of first string comes and then the second character of the second string comes and so on. Best explained by some example cases:

    s1="Mark";
    s2="Zukerberg";  //Output=> MZaurkkerberg

if:

    s1="Zukerberg";
    s2="Mark"        //Output=> ZMuakrekrberg

if:

    s1="Zukerberg";
    s2="Zukerberg";  //Output=> ZZuukkeerrbbeerrgg

I've written the following code which gives the expected output but its seems to be a lot of code. Is there any more efficient way for doing this?

public void SpecialConcat(string s1, string s2)
        {
            string[] concatArray = new string[s1.Length + s2.Length];
            int k = 0;
            string final = string.Empty;
            string superFinal = string.Empty;
            for (int i = 0; i < s1.Length; i++)
            {
                for (int j = 0; j < s2.Length; j++)
                {
                    if (i == j)
                    {
                        concatArray[k] = s1[i].ToString() + s2[j].ToString();
                        final = string.Join("", concatArray);
                    }
                }
                k++;
            }
            if (s1.Length > s2.Length)
            {
                string subOne = s1.Remove(0, s2.Length);
                superFinal = final + subOne;
            }
            else if (s2.Length > s1.Length)
            {
                string subTwo = s2.Remove(0, s1.Length);
                superFinal = final + subTwo;
            }
            else
            {
                superFinal = final;
            }
            Response.Write(superFinal);
        }
    }

I have written the same logic in Javascript also, which works fine but again a lot of code.

share|improve this question
    
but.........why –  Jonesopolis Jul 24 '13 at 16:53
3  
@Jonesy Nothing just for fun and some practice. :) –  RahulD Jul 24 '13 at 16:56
1  
Use IEnumerable<T>.Zip. You'll need ta add the trailing chars yourself. –  Maarten Jul 24 '13 at 16:56

8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted
var s1 = "Mark";
var s2 = "Zukerberg";
var common = string.Concat(s1.Zip(s2, (a, b) => new[]{a, b}).SelectMany(c => c));
var shortestLength = Math.Min(s1.Length, s2.Length);
var result = 
     common + s1.Substring(shortestLength) + s2.Substring(shortestLength);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for the answer. I'm going to try this out. :) –  RahulD Jul 24 '13 at 17:03
    
Works perfectly. :) +1 –  RahulD Jul 24 '13 at 17:12
var stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
for (int i = 0; i < Math.Max(s1.Length, s2.Length); i++)
{
    if (i < s1.Length)
        stringBuilder.Append(s1[i]);

    if (i < s2.Length)
        stringBuilder.Append(s2[i]);
}

string result = stringBuilder.ToString();
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the answer. :) +1 –  RahulD Jul 24 '13 at 17:06
    
Nice use of stringbuilder.. although I do believe this has a lot of excessive if checking.... ie s1 = "a", s2 = "bcderfgasdfaersasadfas" –  Sayse Jul 24 '13 at 17:11
1  
It would be slightly better to say new StringBuilder(s1.Length + s2.Length), otherwise the underlying array might have to be copied over to a longer array once in a while during execution. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 24 '13 at 17:13

In JavaScript, when working with strings, you are also working with arrays, so it will be easier. Also + will concatenate for you. Replace string indexing with charAt if you want IE7- support.

Here is the fiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/z6XLh/1

var s1 = "Mark";
var s2 = "ZuckerFace";
var out ='';

var l = s1.length > s2.length ? s1.length : s2.length
for(var i = 0; i < l; i++) {
    if(s1[i]) {
        out += s1[i];
    }
    if(s2[i]){
        out += s2[i];
    }
}
console.log(out);
share|improve this answer
    
if one string is longer than the other this won't work –  Sayse Jul 24 '13 at 16:55
2  
It does now, after your changes :-) –  Maarten Jul 24 '13 at 16:58
    
If it matters, old browsers (IE 7 and before, at least) don't support String[index] - you should use String.charAt(index) for better support –  Ian Jul 24 '13 at 17:01
    
Thanks for the answer, will try and response back. :) –  RahulD Jul 24 '13 at 17:02
    
@smurf brainy +1. –  RahulD Jul 24 '13 at 17:14
static string Join(string a, string b)
{
   string returnVal = "";
   int length = Math.Min(a.Length, b.Length);
   for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
      returnVal += "" + a[i] + b[i];

   if (a.Length > length)
      returnVal += a.Substring(length);
   else if(b.Length > length)
      returnVal += b.Substring(length);

   return returnVal;
}

Could possibly be improved through stringbuilder

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the answer. I'll try this out. Yes I had also thought of StringBuilder but didn't apply yet. –  RahulD Jul 24 '13 at 17:04

Just for the sake of curiosity, here's an unreadable one-liner (which I have nevertheless split over multiple lines ;))

This uses the fact that padding a string to a certain length does nothing if the string is already at least that length. That means padding each string to the length of the other string will have the result of padding out with spaces the shorter one to the length of the longer one.

Then we use .Zip() to concatenate each of the pairs of characters into a string.

Then we call string.Concat(IEnumerable<string>) to concatenate the zipped strings into a single string.

Finally, we remove the extra padding spaces we introduced earlier by using string.Replace().

var result = string.Concat
(
    s1.PadRight(s2.Length)
    .Zip
    (
        s2.PadRight(s1.Length), 
        (a,b)=>string.Concat(a,b)
    )
).Replace(" ", null);

On one line [insert Coding Horror icon here]:

var result = string.Concat(s1.PadRight(s2.Length).Zip(s2.PadRight(s1.Length), (a,b)=>string.Concat(a,b))).Replace(" ", null);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explaination, it really helped. :) +1 –  RahulD Jul 24 '13 at 19:45

Just off the top of my head, this is how I might do it.

        var s1Length = s1.Length;
        var s2Length = s2.Length;
        var count = 0;
        var o = "";
        while (s1Length + s2Length > 0) {
            if (s1Length > 0) {
                s1Length--;
                o += s1[count];
            }
            if (s2Length > 0) {
                s2Length--;
                o += s2[count];
            }
            count++;
        }
share|improve this answer
1  
+1..Just checked.. :) –  RahulD Jul 24 '13 at 17:32

Here's another one-liner:

var s1 = "Mark";
var s2 = "Zukerberg";
var result = string.Join("", 
  Enumerable.Range(0, s1.Length).ToDictionary(x => x * 2, x => s1[x])
  .Concat(Enumerable.Range(0, s2.Length).ToDictionary(x => x * 2+1, x => s2[x]))
  .OrderBy(d => d.Key).Select(d => d.Value));

Basically, this converts both strings into dictionaries with keys that will get the resulting string to order itself correctly. The Enumerable range is used to associate an index with each letter in the string. When we store the dictionaries, it multiplies the index on s1 by 2, resulting in <0,M>,<2,a>,<4,r>,<6,k>, and multiplies s2 by 2 then adds 1, resulting in <1,Z>,<3,u>,<5,k>, etc.

Once we have these dictionaries, we combine them with the .Concat and sort them with the .OrderBy,which gives us <0,M>,<1,Z>,<2,a>,<3,u>,... Then we just dump them into the final string with the string.join at the beginning.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. Can you please explain a bit, I'm not that expert in C#. :) –  RahulD Jul 24 '13 at 20:28
    
Yep, no worries. See edit in the answer! –  MaxPRafferty Jul 24 '13 at 20:48
    
Thanks a lot. +1 :) –  RahulD Jul 24 '13 at 20:50

Ok, this is the *second shortest solution I could come up with:

    public string zip(string s1, string s2)
    {
        return (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(s1+s2))
            ? (s1[0] + "" + s2[0] + zip(s1.Substring(1) + " ", s2.Substring(1) + " ")).Replace(" ", null)
            : "";
    }

    var result =  zip("mark","zukerberg");

Whoops! My original shortest was the same as mark's above...so, second shortest i could come up with! I had hoped I could really trim it down with the recursion, but not so much.

share|improve this answer
    
Cheers! +1 again. –  RahulD Jul 24 '13 at 21:21

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