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I was asked in an interview the following question: if you have a Stack of Integers how would you find the max value of the Stack without using Collections.max and without iterating over the Stack and comparing elements. I answered it with the below code as I don't know of another way than using any Collections API or iterating over the Stack and using comparisons. Any ideas?

import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.Stack;

public class StackDemo {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        Stack lifo = new Stack();
        lifo.push(new Integer(4));
        lifo.push(new Integer(1));
        lifo.push(new Integer(150));
        lifo.push(new Integer(40));
        lifo.push(new Integer(0));
        lifo.push(new Integer(60));
        lifo.push(new Integer(47));
        lifo.push(new Integer(104));

        if(!lifo.isEmpty()){
            Object max = Collections.max(lifo);
            System.out.println("max=" + max.toString());
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
Crazy long shot, but how literally should we take "comparing elements"? Does comparing an element to an intermediate variable still count (i.e. iterate over the stack, keeping a local maximum and comparing each element to that maximum value) –  lc. Jul 24 '13 at 18:08
4  
I can't see a way to do this if the stack is just handed to you and you're not allowed to look at the contents. Maybe the answer is "define a new Stack subclass where you override the push operation to update an internally-stored max value, and then define public int max(){ return this.maxValue; }"? –  Henry Keiter Jul 24 '13 at 18:09
3  
I suggest that you first write, in English with pencil and paper, a description of the steps you need to solve the problem. –  Code-Apprentice Jul 24 '13 at 18:26
2  
@LukeW. As long as my postulate holds that comparing a single element to a temporary variable does not constitute "comparing elements" –  lc. Jul 24 '13 at 18:48
4  
Can we use StackSort? xkcd.com/1185 (mouseover image) –  Luke Willis Jul 24 '13 at 19:41

13 Answers 13

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Just empty a copy of the stack. pop each of the elements from the copy, checking for max against an integer all the while.

Stack<Integer> lifoCopy = (Stack<Integer>) lifo.clone();
int max = Integer.MIN_VALUE;

while (!lifoCopy.isEmpty())
{
    if (lifoCopy.peek() > max)
        max = lifoCopy.pop();
    else
        lifoCopy.pop();
}

System.out.println("max=" + max.toString());

This will work for you in O(n) time even if your interviewers decide to be more restrictive and not allow more built in functions (max, min, sort, etc.).

Additionally, if you need to have the original unharmed, but can't use clone, you can do so with an extra stack:

Stack<Integer> reverseLifo = new Stack<Integer>();
int max = Integer.MIN_VALUE;

while (!lifo.isEmpty())
{
    if (lifo.peek() > max)
        max = lifoCopy.peek();

    reverseLifo.push(lifo.pop());
}

while (!reverseLifo.isEmpty())
{
    lifo.push(reverseLifo.pop());
}

System.out.println("max=" + max.toString());

Finally, this assumes that comparison against a temp variable is acceptable. If no comparison is allowed at all, then this solution in conjunction with this method will work.

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1  
Wouldn't that reverse the order of the stack? –  StephenTG Jul 24 '13 at 18:06
1  
@StephenTG you are correct. fixed it to use a copy. –  Luke Willis Jul 24 '13 at 18:10
1  
@LukeW. Stack<Integer> lifoCopy = lifo.clone(); won't compile. –  Nima Jul 24 '13 at 18:28
    
@Nima fixed with cast. –  Luke Willis Jul 24 '13 at 18:29
21  
How is this not "iterating over the stack"? –  Ben Jackson Jul 25 '13 at 0:39

By using Collections.min() instead:

if (!lifo.isEmpty()) {
  Integer max = Collections.min(lifo, new Comparator<Integer>() {
    @Override
    public int compare(Integer o1, Integer o2) {
      return o2.compareTo(o1);
    }
  });
  System.out.println("max=" + max.toString());
}

Note that the custom Comparator flips the comparison so that Collections.min() will actually return the max.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, interesting design consideration. –  hexafraction Jul 24 '13 at 18:09
10  
I'm not confident that this is in the spirit of the challenge, but I love the implementation :D –  Henry Keiter Jul 24 '13 at 18:11
12  
@HenryKeiter You're probably right, but I couldn't pass up the opportunity to be a smart-ass! –  DannyMo Jul 24 '13 at 18:18
6  
If it weren't kind of an obnoxious question, I'd say this was an obnoxious answer... but in context, it's perfect. –  mjfgates Jul 24 '13 at 22:22

Not sure will this satisfy your question need, but this way use of max() and iteration could be avoided, anyhow sort does use iteration and Comparable in background.

if (!lifo.isEmpty()) {
    Stack sc = (Stack) lifo.clone();
    Collections.sort(sc);
    System.out.println("max=" + sc.get(sc.size() - 1));
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm guessing this is the answer –  lc. Jul 24 '13 at 18:17
    
@lc. Not sure, but this way stack order can be preserved while satisfying the OPs need. –  Smit Jul 24 '13 at 18:23
1  
@Smit Collections.sort() uses comparisons in the background as well. –  Juvanis Jul 24 '13 at 18:33
2  
@c12 your question should reflect this. –  Luke Willis Jul 24 '13 at 18:33
1  
@Juvanis Thanks for heads up. let me update the answer. and @ c12 I agree with @ LukeW. –  Smit Jul 24 '13 at 18:38
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.Stack;

public class StackDemo {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        Stack lifo = new Stack();
        lifo.push(new Integer(4));
        lifo.push(new Integer(1));
        lifo.push(new Integer(150));
        lifo.push(new Integer(40));
        lifo.push(new Integer(0));
        lifo.push(new Integer(60));
        lifo.push(new Integer(47));
        lifo.push(new Integer(104));


        System.out.println("max= 150"); // http://xkcd.com/221/

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why check isEmpty()? –  Luke Willis Jul 24 '13 at 19:42
    
@LukeW. Where does this check isEmpty()? –  Michael Kjörling Jul 24 '13 at 22:31

This code:

public static Integer max(Stack stack) {
    if (stack.isEmpty()) {
        return Integer.MIN_VALUE;
    }
    else {
        Integer last = (Integer)stack.pop();
        Integer next = max(stack);
        stack.push(last);
        if (last > next) {
            return last;
        }
        else {
            return next;
        }            
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args){
    Stack lifo = new Stack();
    lifo.push(new Integer(4));
    lifo.push(new Integer(1));
    lifo.push(new Integer(150));
    lifo.push(new Integer(40));
    lifo.push(new Integer(0));
    lifo.push(new Integer(60));
    lifo.push(new Integer(47));
    lifo.push(new Integer(104));

    System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(lifo.toArray()));
    System.out.println(max(lifo));
    System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(lifo.toArray()));
}

outputs:

[4, 1, 150, 40, 0, 60, 47, 104]
150
[4, 1, 150, 40, 0, 60, 47, 104]

It is a recursion on a given stack, finds the maximum element and doesn't change the stack order.

However iteration is different from recursion only if you define it like that. Also, to find maximum you must compare all the elements somehow - in whatever mathematical form, with relational or bitwise operators like Anirudh showed. IMHO, pretty vaguely defined task.

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4  
I concur on the vagueness of the question. Some terms need to be clearly defined in the context, for it to be solvable. –  afsantos Jul 24 '13 at 19:36

You can use bitwise operator instead..

public int getMax(int a, int b) 
{
    int c = a - b;
    int k = (c >> 31) & 0x1;
    int max = a - k * c;
    return max;
}

Now you can do

int max=Integer.MIN_VALUE-1; 
while(!stack.empty())
{
    max=getMax(max,stack.pop());
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the comparison without the relational operator. –  linski Jul 24 '13 at 18:49
    
works, but destroys the stack. +1 for the getMax function. If the stack needs to be maintained, you need to clone() or maintain another stack as I discuss in my answer. –  Luke Willis Jul 24 '13 at 18:52
    
@LukeW. ohh..yes..indeed.. –  Anirudha Jul 24 '13 at 18:53
2  
@LukeW. I disagree. From wikipedia, broader definition: "Iteration in computing is the repetition of a block of statements within a computer program." That cover's all the loops and recursion. That's why I think the task is vaguely defined. –  linski Jul 24 '13 at 19:06
1  
@linski Fair point. –  Luke Willis Jul 24 '13 at 19:15

Time to think outside of the box. Use the Wolfram Alpha REST API, and ask it to compute the result of:

"maximum of " + Arrays.deepToString(lifo.toArray())

It will return 150.

share|improve this answer

This can be done in O(1) time and O(n) memory. Modify the push and pop method (or by inheritance extend the standard stack with your own) to keep track of the current max in another stack.

When you push elements onto your stack, push max(currentElem, maxStack.peek()) onto maxStack When you pop elements off the stack, pop the current max from your max stack as well.

This solution illustrates it well, so I won't expand more on it: http://stackoverflow.com/a/3435998/1007845

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2  
I think this must be the correct answer. Outlawing "iteration" sounds like code for O(1) way to get max, which can only be done with a special data structure, not a generic java.util.Stack –  Ben Jackson Jul 25 '13 at 0:43

When you push elements into the stack, update the max value

void main()
    int max = Integer.min
    lifo.push(1)

while

   void push(Integer value) {
       //push into stack
       //update max value
   }
share|improve this answer
4  
Can this be assumed? I believe you are only given a stack of integers. –  Vivin Paliath Jul 24 '13 at 18:06
1  
If you can assume it, that kind of defeats the purpose of the question... –  Dennis Meng Jul 24 '13 at 18:08

Use Collections.sort with a Comparator that sorts in descending order and then peek the top element from the Stack.

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1  
I think OP wants to preserve the stack. –  hexafraction Jul 24 '13 at 18:08
1  
@hexafraction You could make a copy and sort that... –  StephenTG Jul 24 '13 at 18:08
    
Perhaps the answer should at least allude to that. –  hexafraction Jul 24 '13 at 18:09

Without iteration you can do a recursive call. If it's not homework it isn't logical to do so. Or alternatively you can do this without iteration & recursion.

However a quick n simple approach is here:

public class StackDemo {
    public static int max = 0; //set this to least, may be negative
    public static Stack lifo = new Stack();
    public static void main(String[] args){        
        pushToStack(new Integer(4));
        pushToStack(new Integer(1));

        if(!lifo.isEmpty()){
            Object max = Collections.max(lifo);
            System.out.println("max=" + max);
        }
    }
    void static int pushToStack(Integer value){
        lifo.push(value);
        if(max<value){
        max = value;
        }
        return max;
    }    

}
share|improve this answer
    
is this supposed to be recursive ? –  Thousand Jul 24 '13 at 18:15
    
no, its not. its just a non-iterative solution without using max(); –  ay89 Jul 24 '13 at 18:16

You can convert it to a TreeSet with:

int myMax = new TreeSet<Integer>(lifo).last();
share|improve this answer
    
Why are you declaring an explicit comparator here? –  arshajii Jul 24 '13 at 18:11
    
@arshajii It's a very, very bad habit of mine. I've had to work with some really annoying classes over the past few months that didn't handle an obvious natural ordering. –  hexafraction Jul 24 '13 at 18:12
    
new TreeSet(lifo).last() will work fine. –  arshajii Jul 24 '13 at 18:27
    
@arshajii OK then. I'll edit it when I actually have a moment. Feel free to do the edits if you'd like. –  hexafraction Jul 24 '13 at 18:28

HERE IS MY SOLUTION

    import java.util.Arrays;
    import java.util.Collections;
    import java.util.Stack;

 public class StackDemo {
  public static void main(String[] args){
    Stack lifo = new Stack();
    lifo.push(new Integer(4));
    lifo.push(new Integer(1));
    lifo.push(new Integer(150));
    lifo.push(new Integer(40));
    lifo.push(new Integer(0));
    lifo.push(new Integer(60));
    lifo.push(new Integer(47));
    lifo.push(new Integer(104));

    Object lifoArray[] = lifo.toArray();
Arrays.sort(lifoArray);
System.out.println(lifoArray[lifoArray.length-1]);
}
}

Arrays.sort() arranges in ascending order, so the last value in the sorted array will be the max value

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