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I have three marker interfaces for a fluent API's extension methods:

interface IOne { }
interface ITwo { }
interface IOneOrTwo : IOne, ITwo { }

and the following extension method:

public static IOneOrTwo Foo (this IOne obj, string arg)
{
    // do something with arg
    return obj; // <- possible without cast?
}

Question: is it somehow possible to return obj without casting? Normally you need to explicitly downcast in this situation, however, none of those interfaces is requiring the underlying object to have any sort of method/property/whatsoever.

Note: The actual implementation class implements all of the interfaces.

Question 2: Why is implementing IOne and ITwo not automatically let the implementation be also of type IOneOrTwo?

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2  
You seem confused about interface inheritance ... IOneOrTwo is really IOneAndTwo. –  McGarnagle Jul 24 '13 at 18:14
    
It is from the view of my API users: They can act like it is an IOne or an ITwo. Yes, maybe I should change the name back to IOneAndTwo. –  D.R. Jul 24 '13 at 18:18
    
They can act like it is an IOne or an ITwo, but it acts like it is an IOne and an ITwo. Your API users shouldn't need to know that it is one or the other. Any dependency (including marker behaviour) should be dependent on IOne or on ITwo. –  Roger Lipscombe Jul 24 '13 at 18:21
    
IOneOrTwo is more derived. It could have extra things than IOne or ITwo. The compiler wouldnt know how to deal with the possible extra members so it just does not allow it without an explicit cast –  Ryan Bennett Jul 24 '13 at 18:36
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

is it somehow possible to return obj without casting?

No. Just because a class implements IOne does NOT mean it also implements IOneOrTwo. So you need to cast (which may well fail)

none of those interfaces is requiring the underlying object to have any sort of method/property/whatsoever.

That's irrelevant. The lack of actual methods does not magically let you down-cast. If an object implements IOne, technically it could implement IOneOrTwo without adding any methods, but it still would need to explicitly include that in the class definition.

Why is implementing IOne and ITwo not automatically let the implementation be also of type IOneOrTwo

Because IOneOrTwo could include methods that are not part of IOne or ITwo. Just because an object implements IOne and ITwo does not mean it also implements any interface that also includes those two.

You could get what you want using generics:

public static T Foo<T> (this T obj, string arg) where T: IOne
{
    // do something with arg
    return obj; 
}

then you could say:

IOneOrTwo obj = new IOneOrTwoImpl();
IOneOrTwo obj2 = obj.Foo("gfgfd");  // valid since obj implements IOneOrTwo

but you can't do:

IOne obj = new IOneImpl();
IOneOrTwo obj2 = obj.Foo("gfgfd");  // not valid since obj does not implement IOneOrTwo

without a cast.

Bottom line - interface implementations must be explicitly declared. Just because a class can implement an interface (meaning it contains all of the methods/properties that make up that interface) doesn't mean you can treat it as if it does implement that interface.

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Thanks, this is a definitive answer to my question. –  D.R. Jul 24 '13 at 18:45
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It seems like your implementation may be backward and may answer both of your questions to have IOne and ITwo implement IOneOrTwo rather than the other way around.

interface IOneOrTwo { }
interface IOne: IOneOrTwo { }
interface ITwo: IOneOrTwo { }

//*** This should now work fine ***
public static IOneOrTwo Foo (this IOne obj, string arg)
{
    // do something with arg
    return obj;     
}

Clarification:

//This extension method is available to IOne, ITwo, and IOneOrTwo
public static IOneOrTwo Foo2 (this IOneOrTwo obj, string arg)
{
    // do something with arg
    return obj:
}

//This extension method is available only to IOne
public static IOne Foo2 (this IOne obj, string arg)
{
    // do something with arg
    return obj:
}

//This extension method is available only to ITwo
public static ITwo Foo2 (this ITwo obj, string arg)
{
    // do something with arg
    return obj:
}
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I don't think changing the inheritance direction helps. I return an IOne to start the fluent calls, however, now they can immediately call all of the IOneOrTwo extension methods...which is what I wanted to prevent in the first place by creating multiple interfaces. –  D.R. Jul 24 '13 at 18:22
    
Therefore the second option is NOT what I want. I want them to be able to call only IOne methods in the beginning. –  D.R. Jul 24 '13 at 18:25
    
Your logic seems flawed to me, or it is unclear what you're trying to do. If you only want an ext method to be able to be called against IOne it should be defined with IOne with it's parameter. Same goes for ITwo. IOneOrTwo's ext methods will only be what the two implementing classes share. –  Khan Jul 24 '13 at 18:28
1  
The answer is yes. It can, if you reverse your inheritance as I showed. However, if this does not suit your needs. You will need to provide an implementation example which clearly shows why. –  Khan Jul 24 '13 at 18:37
1  
This is the right answer. You want to pass in a interface and then return an interface that can be used by either of the derived interfaces. The return interface needs to be the base. The others should derive from it. It will do what you want, you just need to unroll your thought process a bit. –  Ryan Bennett Jul 24 '13 at 18:38
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