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I don't understand the following behavior:

var Foo = function () {};
var Bar = function () {};
Foo.prototype = Bar;
var foo = new Foo();
console.log(foo.prototype === Bar.prototype); // true, but why?

I can't find anything in the spec regarding the default value of the prototype property on an object created using a constructor. (I did find this part of the spec which mentions that, for functions, the prototype property defaults to new Object(), but no mention of objects created using constructors.)

So, my question is really two-fold:

What is the default value of the prototype property on an object created using a constructor? (It seems like it is the prototype property of the prototype property of the constructor; e.g. Foo.prototype.prototype)

Where does it explain this behavior in the spec?

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you set "Foo.prototype = Bar", why would it be anything else? –  dandavis Jul 24 '13 at 18:36
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@dandavis: OPs point is Bar = Foo.prototype so s/he is visualizing Foo.prototype == (Foo.prototype).prototype. –  Brad Christie Jul 24 '13 at 18:37
    
ahh. the default value of the prototype property on an object created using a constructor is a blank object derived from that constructor. ex: new String() will give you an object with few own methods, but all the inherited String.prototype methods like slice() and bold(). if you compare inst.bold to String.prototype.bold, they should be the same. –  dandavis Jul 24 '13 at 18:40
    
@dandavis, I'm not sure we're on the same page. Open a console and type var x = new String(); console.log(x.prototype); and you'll see it's actually undefined. I believe you're speaking of the prototype of the object, not the prototype property on the object. (In Chrome, this is the __proto__ property.) –  Lukas Jul 24 '13 at 18:46
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I just want to point out (because you didn't make it explicit in your question) that Foo.prototype = Bar; is totally the wrong way to do prototype chaining. It should be Foo.prototype = new Bar; or Foo.prototype = Object.create(Bar.prototype);. Maybe you already knew this? –  apsillers Jul 24 '13 at 19:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What is the default value of the prototype property on an object created using a constructor?

undefined, unless what you're constructing is a function. The prototype property belongs on functions. If an instance object does not have a function object in its prortype chain (i.e., instanceObj instanceof Function is false), the instance generally will not have a prototype property.

The reason that functions have a prototype property because any function might someday be used as a constructor. A constructor's prototype property determines the [[Prototype]] internal property of its constructed instances.

(It seems like it is the prototype property of the prototype property of the constructor; e.g. Foo.prototype.prototype)

You only see with behavior because you've assigned Foo.prototype to the function Bar. Thus, when you try to get foo.prototype, the interpreter looks up foo's prototype chain and finds the prototype property on the function Bar.

In particular, foo.prototype === Bar.prototype is true because:

  1. To get foo.prototype, we first try to get prototype off of foo.
  2. foo has no prototype property.
  3. Look up the prototype chain: foo's [[Prototype]] was set to Foo.prototype when foo was constructed. (Remember, Foo.prototype is the function Bar.)
  4. Look for prototype on Bar.
  5. Success! Bar.prototype is defined. Use that for foo.prototype.
  6. Unsurprisingly, Bar.prototype is equal to Bar.prototype.

Where does it explain this behavior in the spec?

  • 15.3.5.2 explains that the prototype property is used as the [[Prototype]] internal property of its constructed objects.

  • 13.2.2 (steps 5 - 7) spells out the exact procedure described in 15.3.5.2, above.

  • 8.6.2 describes general prototype-based inheritance (i.e., if an object doesn't have a property, look at its [[Prototype]], etc.)

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Thank you for the brilliant explanation. I now feel like an idiot for not checking foo.hasOwnProperty("prototype") and seeing that it was false. –  Lukas Jul 24 '13 at 19:42

The prototype of a constructed object is the object referenced by the constructor function's .prototype property.

So because foo.__proto__ === Bar, then obviously foo.__proto__.prototype = Bar.prototype.

The foo object does not have .prototype property, it is looked and found in foo.__proto__ because the object's prototype is a function object which have a prototype property, this is what you missed.

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If the prototype of a constructed object is the object referenced by the constructor function's .prototype property, then it all makes sense. Is this explicitly detailed in the specs? –  rid Jul 24 '13 at 19:15
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That's it. And the answer to the question What is the default value of the prototype property on an object created using a constructor? is, it's undefined. –  bfavaretto Jul 24 '13 at 19:15
    
@rid yes ecma-international.org/ecma-262/5.1/#sec-13.2.2 –  Esailija Jul 24 '13 at 19:16
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@rid See also ecma-international.org/ecma-262/5.1/#sec-4.2.1 –  bfavaretto Jul 24 '13 at 19:22

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