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What is the ideal way to display duplicate rows in Oracle? The trick here is that I am looking for all rows no just the multiples (duplicates). So for example on the below data set:

RSN fname   lname   emailaddress
1   John    Smith   j.smith@system.com
2   John    Smith   j.smith@system.com
3   John    Smith   j.smith@system.com
4   Kevin   Walker  k.walker@system.com
5   James   Kirk    j.kirk@system.com
6   James   Kirk    j.kirk@system.com
7   Kevin   James   k.james@system.com
8   Mike    Jones   m.jones@system.com

I would want the following returned:

1   John    Smith   j.smith@system.com
2   John    Smith   j.smith@system.com
3   John    Smith   j.smith@system.com
5   James   Kirk    j.kirk@system.com
6   James   Kirk    j.kirk@system.com

Any help?

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here, let me search for you –  tbone Jul 24 '13 at 18:50
    
I searched extensively, however, the results I found returned only the duplicates, that is the rows that are the second or higher instance of a given criteria. But thanks for the input. –  b1shp Jul 24 '13 at 19:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's one way:

SELECT RSN, fname, lname, emailaddress
  FROM whatever_your_table_is_named t1
 WHERE ( SELECT COUNT(1)
           FROM whatever_your_table_is_named t2
          WHERE t2.fname = t1.fname
            AND t2.lname = t1.lname
            AND t2.emailaddress = t1.emailaddress
            AND ROWNUM < 3
       ) > 1
;

Here's another:

SELECT t1.RSN, t1.fname, t1.lname, t1.emailaddress
  FROM whatever_your_table_is_named t1
  JOIN ( SELECT fname, lname, emailaddress
           FROM whatever_your_table_is_named
          GROUP
             BY fname, lname, emailaddress
         HAVING COUNT(1) > 1
       ) t2
    ON t1.fname = t2.fname
   AND t1.lname = t2.lname
   AND t1.emailaddress = t2.emailaddress
;

(Disclaimer: I haven't tested either of these.)

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Thanks, I have no idea how optimal it is, since obviously my Oracle skills aren't great, but it definitely works. Thanks ruakh! –  b1shp Jul 24 '13 at 19:13
    
That count(1) is ugly. It's non-standard and no better than count(*). Rumours of its superiority performance-wise are just myths. –  David Aldridge Jul 24 '13 at 19:28
    
Well any improvements are very welcome. I'll be running this against over a million records. –  b1shp Jul 24 '13 at 19:34
    
@DavidAldridge: I'm aware that there's no performance advantage of COUNT(1) over COUNT(*) -- nor disadvantage, they're simply equivalent -- but I often use COUNT to count non-null values, so I find COUNT(1) (meaning "count the records where 1 is non-null") to be more logical than COUNT(*) (meaning "OMG magical syntax that costs an extra keystroke and looks like it should have something to do with other uses of * even though it doesn't"). When you say it's "ugly" and "non-standard", what do you mean by that? –  ruakh Jul 24 '13 at 19:57
    
count(*) means "count the records" according to the ANSI SQL standard (and the documentation), so by definition anything else -- count(1), count(0), count('X') -- is non-standard. As I say, there's a myth that count(1) is faster than count(*), so every time a person who believes in the myth sees it, it reinforces their false belief. When a person who has never heard of the myth sees it, it can lead to an "investigation" that converts them to a false belief. I think it should be discouraged, having as it does these disadvantages and no advantages. –  David Aldridge Jul 24 '13 at 20:41

this subquery will get the duplicates form the table.

    select *
    from (some table)
    where rsn IN (select rsn
                  from (some table) 
                   where fname IN 
                   (select fname
                    from (select fname, count(fname) as dup 
           from (some table)) where dup > 1)
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