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I'm looking to call the Rows.Scan() function using reflection. However it takes a variable number of pointers, but I'm new to Go (Golang) and there are not a lot of source examples. I need to use reflection because I plan on filling a slice with the values from a Query call. So basically using rows.Columns() to get the length of the row and then make() a slice of []interface{} to fill with the data points that would normally be filled using the pointers passed to the Scan() function.

Basically something like this code:

col := rows.Columns()
vals := make([]interface{}, len(cols))
rows.Scan(&vals)

Anyone have an example of calling a variadic function that takes pointers using reflection that I can take a look at?

Edit: Sample code that doesn't appear to do what I'm after.

package main

import (
    _ "github.com/lib/pq"
    "database/sql"
    "fmt"
)


func main() {

    db, _ := sql.Open(
        "postgres",
        "user=postgres dbname=Go_Testing password=ssap sslmode=disable")

    rows, _ := db.Query("SELECT * FROM _users;")

    cols, _ := rows.Columns()

    for rows.Next() {

        data := make([]interface{}, len(cols))

        rows.Scan(data...)

        fmt.Println(data)
    }

}

The results:

[<nil> <nil> <nil> <nil> <nil>]
[<nil> <nil> <nil> <nil> <nil>]
[<nil> <nil> <nil> <nil> <nil>]
[<nil> <nil> <nil> <nil> <nil>]
[<nil> <nil> <nil> <nil> <nil>]
[<nil> <nil> <nil> <nil> <nil>]
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Here's the solution that I've arrived at. It doesn't get the Types before traversing the data, and so doesn't know before hand the type of each value before pulling the values out through Scan(), but the point really is to not have to know the types before hand.

The trick was to create 2 slices, one for the values, and one that holds pointers in parallel to the values slice. Then once the pointers are used to fill data, the values array is actually filled with the data, which can then be used to populate other data structures.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    _ "github.com/lib/pq"
    "database/sql"
)

func main() {

    db, _ := sql.Open(
        "postgres",
        "user=postgres dbname=go_testing password=pass sslmode=disable")

    rows, _ := db.Query("SELECT * FROM _user;")

    columns, _ := rows.Columns()
    count := len(columns)
    values := make([]interface{}, count)
    valuePtrs := make([]interface{}, count)

    for rows.Next() {

        for i, _ := range columns {
            valuePtrs[i] = &values[i]
        }

        rows.Scan(valuePtrs...)

        for i, col := range columns {

            var v interface{}

            val := values[i]

            b, ok := val.([]byte)

            if (ok) {
                v = string(b)
            } else {
                v = val
            }

            fmt.Println(col, v)
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I don't think you need reflection for this - you can use a slice and the ... operator to pass multiple values to a variadic function.

col := rows.Columns()
vals := make([]interface{}, col)
rows.Scan(vals...)

I may be misunderstanding what you want to do though!

share|improve this answer
    
Well, that seems like it would work. I've updated my question with example code. Using the ... operator with this code produces and invalid memory address or nil pointer dereference. I feel like I need to initialize the data array with pointers or something... –  lucidquiet Jul 25 '13 at 13:38
    
Scratch that, the memory address issue was with my sql and not the operator usages. I can compile and run the code with the fix now, but I get no data, every entry into the data (or in your example vals), is nil. So, ultimately this didn't quite work as I'd like. –  lucidquiet Jul 25 '13 at 14:22
    
-1: Rows.Columns() returns ([]string, error); further, Scan() fails if you don't pass in pointers (and it will complain that []interface{} is not an array of pointers unless you initialize its values to be pointers to interfaces a la the accepted answer). –  weberc2 May 6 at 16:22

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