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I'm doing a .wrap() like so (simplified for readability):

$p = $('<em>​sdf​</em>​');
$f = $('<span><p></p></span>');

$r = $p.wrap($f);

Now I'm trying to access the resultant <span><p><em>sdf</em></p></span> as it's own jQuery object. But $r returns the same thing as $p. Apparently that's how .wrap() works: it returns the wrapped element but nothing else.

How do I get at the full enchilada? Since this is part of a more complex function I cannot make assumptions about the depth of my wrapper tree. Could be 2 elements or 6.

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1  
+1 I found this confusing too. Mmm, enchilada. –  Ralph Lavelle Nov 12 '13 at 4:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The obvious answer is:

$r = $p.wrap($f).parent();

Incidentally, you're working on a faulty assumption: a p cannot contain another p element. Ever. The DOM, once constructed, will move the inner p element out of the intended 'parent' element.

If you're constructing something of arbitrary depth, and want to identify the top-most element, then you could, of course, use:

$r = $p.wrap($f).parents().last();

Though this assumes that the elements being wrapped aren't present in the DOM at this point, but if they are then you can use a selector with parents() to limit the potential results:

$r = $p.wrap($f).parents('parentClassName').last();

You could, of course, always write a simple jQuery plugin, such as:

(function ($) {
    $.fn.altWrap = function (node) {
        var topmost = node[0];
        this.wrap(node);
        return topmost;
    };
})(jQuery);

Which allows for the following to (seemingly) work under the constraints I think you're under:

$p = $('<em>​sdf​</em>​');
$f = $('<div><div><span><p></p></span></div></div>');

$r = $p.altWrap($f);

console.log($p,$f,$r);

JS Fiddle demo.

Updated the plugin solution with some (necessary) sanity-checking:

(function ($) {
    $.fn.altWrap = function (node) {
        var topmost, _tmp;
        if (node && node.length) {
            _tmp = node[0];
            while (_tmp.firstChild && _tmp.firstChild.nodeType == 1) {
                _tmp = _tmp.firstChild;
            }
            $(_tmp).append(this);
            topmost = node[0];
        }
        else {
            topmost = this;
        }
        return topmost;
    };
})(jQuery);

$p = $('<em>​sdf​</em>​');
$p2 = $('<em>some text</em>');
$f = $('<div><div><span><p></p></span></div></div>');

console.log($p2.altWrap($f));

JS Fiddle demo.

References:

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I guess I have to start disclaiming my questions and clarify that I simplify my code for easier consumption. This is part of a generic function, and I have different numbers of elements, so accessing it with .parent() is not going to be of use if I have a tree n nodes deep –  tim Jul 24 '13 at 22:48
1  
Hence the later developments in the answer. Unfortunately, without knowing the constraints under which you're working it's very hard to offer a complete (or guaranteed) answer. –  David Thomas Jul 24 '13 at 22:50
    
yea. I'm trusting that using other jQuery functions are the only way. I had hoped there is something akin to how .append() differs from .appendTo() where they each essentially do the same thing but return different objects as their result. –  tim Jul 24 '13 at 22:55
    
I've added a possible plugin that's basically an adapted form of wrap(), which might solve your problem a little more accurately. –  David Thomas Jul 24 '13 at 22:59
    
@tim: out of curiosity, did the plugin work at all? –  David Thomas Jul 26 '13 at 23:10

Yes, wrap returns the object itself again to provide function chaining like $p.wrap(...).animate(...).remove(); and so on.

Since you wrap your $p into an p into an span you can get the "full enchilada" via $r = $p.wrap($f).parent().parent();

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thanks. I am really not very good at asking proper questions I realize. Sorry. I edited the question for clarification. –  tim Jul 24 '13 at 22:52

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