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I'm having trouble getting rid of some zombie processes. I've read some of the other answers to this problem and from what I gather is this occurs when your child processes do not close correctly. I wasn't having this problem until I added a while loop to my code. Take a look.

def worker(self):
    cmd = ["/home/orlando/CountMem","400000000","2000"]
    p = subprocess.Popen(cmd,stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
    id_list = []
    id_list.append(p.pid)



    while len(id_list) > 0:
         for num in id_list:
             stat_file = open("/proc/{0}/status".format(num))
             mem_dict = {}
             for i, line in enumerate(stat_file):
                 if i == 3:
                    #print line
                     mem_dict['ID'] = line
                     print(mem_dict)
                 if i == 10:
                    #print line
                     mem_dict['Mem'] = line
                     print(mem_dict)

    return id_list

if __name__ == '__main__':
    count = multiprocessing.cpu_count()
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool(processes = count)
    print(pool.map(worker,['ls']*count))

my code loops through the "/proc/PID/status" of each child process multiple times grabbing information. Without the "while" loop it doesn't spawn zombie processes but it also doesn't fulfill what I want it to do. With the loop it fulfills what I want it to do but it also spawns zombie processes. My question is how do I keep my code from spawning zombies. Below is some of the output I get:

{'ID': 'Pid:\t2446\n'}                                                                                              
{'ID': 'Pid:\t2441\n'}                                                                                              
{'Mem': 'VmPeak:\t  936824 kB\n', 'ID': 'Pid:\t2446\n'}                                                             
{'Mem': 'VmPeak:\t  542360 kB\n', 'ID': 'Pid:\t2441\n'}                                                             
{'ID': 'Pid:\t2442\n'}                                                                                              
{'Mem': 'VmPeak:\t 1037580 kB\n', 'ID': 

this continues until the child processes are complete then it immediately begins printing this:

{'ID': 'Pid:\t2602\n'}                                                                                              
{'ID': 'Pid:\t2607\n'}                                                                                              
{'ID': 'Pid:\t2606\n'}                                                                                              
{'ID': 'Pid:\t2604\n'}                                                                                              
{'ID': 'Pid:\t2605\n'}                                                                                              
{'Mem': 'Threads:\t1\n', 'ID': 'Pid:\t2606\n'}                                                                      
{'Mem': 'Threads:\t1\n', 'ID': 'Pid:\t2607\n'}                                                                      
{'Mem': 'Threads:\t1\n', 'ID': 'Pid:\t2605\n'}                                                                      
{'Mem': 'Threads:\t1\n', 'ID': 'Pid:\t2604\n'} 

Can anyone help me understand and solve what is happening?

share|improve this question
    
It has nothing to do with the children "not closing correctly". It has everything to do with the parent not responding to its dead children. Do not ignore your dead children. This is valid in life as well as computing. –  William Pursell Jul 24 '13 at 22:57
    
I agree but that doesn't help me understand what is wrong with my code. –  Orlando Elias Jul 25 '13 at 15:55
    
If you are getting zombies, there is only one reason: the parent process is not waiting for the children. At some point, you need to add p.wait() to clean up the zombies. –  William Pursell Jul 25 '13 at 17:21
    
I've tried adding p.wait() in multiple places. It either cleans up the zombie processes but stop the program from completing its original purpose or it won't have any effect. –  Orlando Elias Jul 25 '13 at 20:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I figured out the answer I needed to add p.poll() I added it inside the while loop.

def worker(self):
    cmd = ["/home/orlando/CountMem","400000000","2000"]
    p = subprocess.Popen(cmd,stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
    id_list = []
    id_list.append(p.pid)



    while len(id_list) > 0:
         for num in id_list:
             stat_file = open("/proc/{0}/status".format(num))
             mem_dict = {}
             for i, line in enumerate(stat_file):
                 if i == 3:
                    #print line
                     mem_dict['ID'] = line
                     print(mem_dict)
                 if i == 10:
                    #print line
                     mem_dict['Mem'] = line
                     print(mem_dict)
         p.poll()
    return id_list

if __name__ == '__main__':
    count = multiprocessing.cpu_count()
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool(processes = count)
    print(pool.map(worker,['ls']*count))
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