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I've read about "enum" but I still don't get it.Can someone please explain to me how it works? Also: In one of my calculator codes someone told me to use enum in the code, where should I put it and why?

Here's my code:

import java.util.Scanner;
import javax.swing.JOptionPane;

public class calculatorApplet {
    Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Welcome to the Calculator!");
        String option = JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null,
                "Which calculator mode do you want?");
        if (option.equals("Addition")) {
            Double add1 = Double.parseDouble(JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null,
                    "Okay type the first number(s) of your addition problem."));
            Double add2 = Double.parseDouble(JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null,
                    "Now type the second number(s) of your addition problem."));
            Double preAdd = add1 + add2;
            Double Add = preAdd;
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "The sum is " + Add + ".");
        } else {
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Huh?");
        }
        if (option.equals("Subtraction")) {
            Double sub1 = Double
                    .parseDouble(JOptionPane
                            .showInputDialog(null,
                                    "Okay type the first number(s) of your subtraction problem."));
            Double sub2 = Double
                    .parseDouble(JOptionPane
                            .showInputDialog(null,
                                    "Now type the second number(s) of your subtraction problem."));
            Double preSub = sub1 - sub2;
            Double Sub = preSub;
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "The difference is " + Sub
                    + ".");
        } else {
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Huh?");
        }
        if (option.equals("Multiplication")) {
            Double mult1 = Double
                    .parseDouble(JOptionPane
                            .showInputDialog(null,
                                    "Okay type the first number(s) of your multiplication problem."));
            Double mult2 = Double
                    .parseDouble(JOptionPane
                            .showInputDialog(null,
                                    "Now type the second number(s) of your multiplication problem."));
            Double preMult = mult1 * mult2;
            Double Mult = preMult;
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "The product is " + Mult + ".");
        } else {
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Huh?");
        }
        if (option.equals("Division")) {
            Double div1 = Double.parseDouble(JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null,
                    "Okay type the first number(s) of your division problem."));
            Double div2 = Double.parseDouble(JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null,
                    "Now type the second number(s) of your division problem."));
            Double preDiv = div1 / div2;
            Double Div = preDiv;
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "The quotient is " + Div + ".");
        } else {
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Huh?");
        }
        // End of if statements.
    }

}
share|improve this question
2  
Enum –  nachokk Jul 24 '13 at 23:28
    
Double use a Double when a double is more appropriate. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 24 '13 at 23:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

An enum is essentially a constrained set of values.

A good use in your applet would be to replace the Strings "Addition", "Subtraction", "Multiplication", and "Division".

The problem with using Strings is that you could get any value at all, hence your need for the "huh" code.

You could replace this with:

private enum Operation {ADDITION, SUBTRACTION, MULTIPLICATION, DIVISION}

Then, instead of asking for a String, present these four options, and return an instance of Operation. It will be guaranteed to be one of the four values.

Then, instead of a bunch of "if" statements, you can use a "switch" statement, as in

Operation operation = askUserForOperation();
switch(operation) {
  case ADDITION:
     // do addition
     break;

   case SUBTRACTION:
     // do subtraction
     break;

   case MULTIPLICATION:
      // do multiplication
      break;

    case DIVISION:
      // do division
      break;
}

Enums can also have members, like classes. So, if you want to associate other data with your enums, you can. For instance:

private enum Operation {
   ADDITION("Add"), SUBTRACTION("Subtract"), MULTIPLICATION("Multiply"), DIVISION("Divide");

   public final String name;

   Operation(String name) {
       this.name = name;      
   }
}

Then, you could do something like:

Operation operation = askUserForOperation();
System.out.println("you chose: " + operation.name);
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, thanks for the help! Those examples just explained everything-ish (probably there is way more to it). –  Carlos Lombardii Jul 24 '13 at 23:39
    
@user2614523 I suggest you read the documentation Oracle provides as well, a quick google will find it. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 24 '13 at 23:53

From the docs, emphasis mine:

An enum type is a special data type that enables for a variable to be a set of predefined constants. The variable must be equal to one of the values that have been predefined for it. Common examples include compass directions (values of NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, and WEST) and the days of the week.

Because they are constants, the names of an enum type's fields are in uppercase letters.

In the Java programming language, you define an enum type by using the enum keyword. For example, you would specify a days-of-the-week enum type as:

public enum Day {
    SUNDAY, MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY,
    THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY 
}

You should use enum types any time you need to represent a fixed set of constants. That includes natural enum types such as the planets in our solar system and data sets where you know all possible values at compile time—for example, the choices on a menu, command line flags, and so on.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/enum.html

share|improve this answer

enums are fixed set of things, of similar type. Say, Days, Months etc. In a calculator program, enums can be used for supported arithmatic operations. like addition, subtraction etc.

enum calc{
ADD, SUB, MULTI, DIV
}

so that you can use them like

if (option == calc.SUB)
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I see... Thanks a lot! –  Carlos Lombardii Jul 24 '13 at 23:35
    
and what type is option? –  nachokk Jul 25 '13 at 1:08
    
@nachokk do you mean my variable "option"? If so it's a string variable. –  Carlos Lombardii Jul 25 '13 at 11:49
    
@user2614523 then this won't be true never, cause calc.SUB is not String, option should be Enum –  nachokk Jul 25 '13 at 12:52
    
@nachokk if you have noticed, i gave a hint, not the whole code –  ay89 Jul 25 '13 at 16:11

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