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I want to delete every coin that has the delete boolean set to true, and I know I can't delete it from the same collection the foreach is iterating over. So I made a copy (temp) but it keeps throwing the same exception:

Collection was modified; enumeration operation may not execute.

What am I doing wrong? Here's my code:

List<Coin> temp = coins;
foreach (Coin c in coins)
{
    if (c.delete)
        temp.Remove(c);
    else
        c.somethingElse();
}
coins = temp;
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Simplest thing to do here is to call coins.RemoveAll(coin => coin.delete);. (google List.RemoveAll). That leaves you with a list of coins with all the "deletes" removed in one statement, no need to worry about counters or loop variables or temp copies or whatever at all. So then you can iterate over the remaining coins doing whatever you want.

coins.RemoveAll(coin => coin.delete);
foreach (var coin in coins)
    coin.somethingElse();

If you need a faster implementation that only iterates through the list once, here's what you'd need. Don't use any solution with Remove or RemoveAt in a loop because those are slow operations, so using them in a loop will kill performance. The below will just move each "good" coin down to the index position and then increment index, so at any time all the "good" coins are below index. Finally you remove all the coins above index, so you've got only "good" coins left. Since it only iterates once, it's about 2x faster than the RemoveAll option, and way faster than any of the solutions Remove or RemoveAt in a loop.

var index = 0;
for (var i = 0; i < coins.Count; ++i)
{
    var coin = coins[i];
    if (!coin.delete)
    {
        coin.somethingElse();
        coins[index++] = coin;
    }
}
coins.RemoveRange(index, coins.Count - index);
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That's pretty amazing, but is it efficient? I mean, there wouldn't you be doing two iterations over the list? (I don't know how the RemoveAll method works internally) –  Nico Jul 25 '13 at 1:02
    
You can't really avoid 2 iterations when using a foreach to remove items due to the collection modification limitation. It might be possible to make it slightly more more efficient with a for loop instead of foreach, but probably not worth it in most cases. Readability vs premature optimization. –  craftworkgames Jul 25 '13 at 1:27
    
@Nico it's going to be faster than removing each element one at a time; List.Remove is a relatively slow operation so even though you're only iterating once, you're calling that slow operation multiple times. One call to List.RemoveAll will outperform that any day. If performance is absolutely key and you don't care about the order of your coins, you can use a HashSet<Coin> instead of a List<Coin>. –  Dax Fohl Jul 25 '13 at 2:01
    
I don't know if the performance here is so important, it's for a monogame game. At least for now I'll use the 'for instead foreach' option. –  Nico Jul 25 '13 at 2:08
    
@Nico I tried it out and HashSet turned out to be slower anyway. HashSet is faster for determining if your set/list contains a certain element, but slower for inserting and deleting than a List. –  Dax Fohl Jul 25 '13 at 16:17

What am I doing wrong?

The reason your code doesn't work is because you are only copying the reference to the coins variable. A like a pointer in C, a reference is nothing but a variable that holds the memory address of another type. So the temp variable is pointing at the exact same collection as the coins variable.

So I made a copy (temp)

What your code is intended to do (as you describe it) is this:

List<Coin> temp = coins.ToList();
foreach (Coin c in coins)
{
    if (c.delete)
        temp.Remove(c);
    else
        c.somethingElse();
}
coins = temp;

(see Enumerable.ToList)

As Dax has already mentioned, there are also other, shorter ways to achieve the same result. List.RemoveAll is a perfectly acceptable solution in this case. You might also want to look into LINQ queries.

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Thanks man, I didn't know that = only copied the reference, but I guess it makes sense since you cand redefine it. Would vote up if had enough rep :P –  Nico Jul 25 '13 at 1:28
    
Happy to help. This problem has tripped me up a few times. You can't redefine assignment operators (=) in C# (for good reason). msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8edha89s(v=vs.71).aspx –  craftworkgames Jul 25 '13 at 1:38
    
Lol, thanks for that tip :P –  Nico Jul 25 '13 at 2:09

Since you tagged your question with "xna" and "monogame", you may benefit from a solution that avoids generating garbage (heap memory allocations that will trigger subsequent garbage collector churning). Here's what I'd use, which also works in any programming language with a list type data structure, even if the magic of LINQ isn't available:

// Iterate the list backwards so we never skip items or accidentally
// access past the end of the list.
for (int i = coins.Count - 1; i >= 0; --i)
{
   if (coins[i].delete)
   {
      coins.RemoveAt(i);
   }
   else
   {
      coins[i].somethingElse();
   }
}

In @DaxFohl's solution, I believe that the creation of a lambda ("coin => coin.delete") will allocate garbage memory on the heap. And it's also possible that the enumeration will allocate from the heap, at least in Mono. I've heard a rumor that Microsoft's canonical .NET implementation on Windows has those enumerations super-optimized w.r.t. memory usage, but I like to play it on the safe side in my own game logic.

On the other hand, if this isn't an inner loop specimen of your logic (e.g. called very frequently in the Update method), then it may not matter so much if a little bit of garbage is generated here.

share|improve this answer
    
That's cool bro; and yes, it's called inside the update method of my game, it's a way of disposing the coins my player collected. What are you developing? –  Nico Jul 30 '13 at 0:24
    
A physics based game for iOS, Android, Win8, WP and OS X. Hence staying really basic so everything works well on MS .NET as well as Mono is important to me. Good luck with your project! –  WolfRevokCats Aug 2 '13 at 20:21

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