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I have a few generic classes that implement a common non-generic interface. I create my generic objects and add them to a list. How can I use LINQ, or any other method for that matter, to filter the list by the generic type. I do not need to know T at run-time. I added a type property to the interface and used LINQ to filter by it but I was hoping to use the is operator. Here's a simple example I threw together.

Any Ideas?

interface IOperation
    {
        object GetValue();
    }
    class Add<T> : IOperation
    {
        public object GetValue()
        {
            return 0.0;
        }
    }
    class Multiply<T> : IOperation
    {
        public object GetValue()
        {
            return 0.0;
        }
    }


    private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        //create some generics referenced by interface
        var operations = new List<IOperation>
        {
            new Add<int>(),
            new Add<double>(),
            new Multiply<int>()
        };

        //how do I use LINQ to find all intances off Add<T> 
        //without specifying T?

        var adds =
            from IOperation op in operations
            where op is Add<> //this line does not compile
            select op;
    }
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can just compare the underlying non-parameterized type names:

var adds =
    from IOperation op in operations
    where op.GetType().Name == typeof(Add<>).Name
    select op;

Note that in the next version of C#, this will be possible due to variance:

var adds =
    from IOperation op in operations
    where op is Add<object>
    select op;
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+1 for you sir. Well done! –  Steve Nov 23 '09 at 17:52
    
+1 ............... –  eglasius Nov 23 '09 at 17:53
1  
Remember, covariance and contravariance in C# 4 only applies to generic interfaces and delegates, not to classes and structs, and the type arguments must be reference types. Would all those criteria be met in this example? –  Eric Lippert Nov 23 '09 at 21:41
    
Not to classes? I can pretty well use ReadonlyList<int> with ReadonlyList<object>, can't I? –  Dario Nov 24 '09 at 16:18
    
Oops, you're right about variance. We'd need interfaces thou. –  Dario Nov 24 '09 at 16:33
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