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This is probably the most unusual CSS behavior I have ever seen:

I have an extremely simple table that consists of two cells - one with plain text and another with a link:

<div class="content">
  <table>
    <tr>
      <td>
        Hello, world!
      </td>
      <td>
        <a href="#">Hello, world!</a>
      </td>
    </tr>
  </table>
</div>

I have also applied the following CSS to the table:

div.content {
  background-color: green;
  height: 100px;
}

table td {
  background-color: red;
  height: 50px;
}

table td a {
  background-color: orange;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  display: block;
  height: 100%;
  padding: 8px;
  width: 100%;
}

When rendered in Chrome 28, I see the following:

enter image description here

Why is there a large amount of red above and below the link? I have specified height: 100%; for the link, so it should be taking up the full height of the <td>, which has an explicit height.

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1  
This is a known bug, unfortunately. There's a whole set of bug reports surrounding box-sizing and tables in chrome. I guess you just need to jury-rig something –  Dom Day Jul 25 '13 at 5:23

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's definitely an issue with the box-sizing:border-box attribute. My guess is that putting that inside a table cell (which is treated differently then a div) is confusing the browser. Often, new techniques + old techniques don't mix.

I would suggest doing the following:

table td a {
  background-color: orange;
  display: block;
  height: 100%;
  padding: 8px;
} 

The width:100% was unneeded since the table cell already expanded to the text width + padding width. For some reason, it doesn't seem to add the padding to the height 100% with the table cell (go figure, weirdness with tables! lol). If you need it to expand to a larger table cell width, I would suggest then putting the width:100% back but then ditch the horizontal padding (i.e. put padding:8px 0px;).

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Also if you want to get your text perfectly aligned vertically, try putting: padding:0px; line-height:50px; (the line height is a trick to align text vertically, but it must match the cell height and can only be on ONE line) –  TCD Factory Jul 25 '13 at 5:25
    
In this particular case, the cell will always display a single line, so this could work. –  Nathan Osman Jul 25 '13 at 5:28
    
And this is why Mozilla chooses to err on the side of caution and keep -moz-box-sizing prefixed... –  BoltClock Jul 25 '13 at 5:32
    
Yea, well box-sizing is a relatively new thing. Especially compared to tables. ;) Anyways if this works just use this then-- background-color: orange; box-sizing: border-box; display: block; height: 100%; padding: 0 8px; width: 100%; line-height: 50px; –  TCD Factory Jul 25 '13 at 5:39
    
Not for IE, that's for sure :P –  BoltClock Jul 25 '13 at 5:39

As far as I think its the box-sizing attribute causing this, change your css to:

table td a {
   background-color: black;
   height: 100%;
   display:block;
   margin: 0;
   padding: 0px;
   width: 100%;
   padding-top: 12px;
 }

Hope that helps;

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Then the horizontal padding would cause the width of the <a> to spill outside the parent <td>. –  Nathan Osman Jul 25 '13 at 5:14
    
That's where I've changed the padding CSS as well. :) –  SHANK Jul 25 '13 at 5:18
    
Unfortunately I need the padding. –  Nathan Osman Jul 25 '13 at 5:21

Add This Code to table td:

display:inline-block;

because There is some difference between tables and divisions in box modeling.

you must set display-block on any none-block element for apply box-model style.

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Try setting height in px for a as

table td a {
  background-color: orange;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  display: block;
  height: 50px;
  padding: 8px;
  width: 100%;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That only removes a tiny sliver (maybe 1px or so) of red. –  Nathan Osman Jul 25 '13 at 5:20
    
You can set the height for <a> in px instead of % (which won't affect sometimes). You have set the td height as 50px. set the same to <a>. –  Bharadwaj Jul 25 '13 at 5:29

here's an example of a jury-rig: http://jsfiddle.net/rTAwd/

We're using a line height to adjust the cell's height, so we don't need to mess with vertical alignment, and relying on a wrapper div to provide our background and padding.

<div class="content">
    <table>
        <tr>
            <td>Hello, world!</td>
            <td>
                <div> <a href="#">Hello, world!</a></div>
            </td>
        </tr>
    </table>
</div>

css

div.content {
    background-color: green;
    height: 100px;
}
table td {
    background-color: red;
}
table td div a {
    line-height: 2em;
}
table td div {
    background-color: orange;
    padding: 8px;
}
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I think its a bug, i had the same issue a while ago, if you want the text to vertically align in the middle, instead of using display:block on the <a> tag use display:table and use border-spacing instead of padding, like this:

table td a {
  background-color: orange;  
  display: table;
  height: 100%;
  border-spacing: 8px 13px;
}

I removed the width:100% too since it will do it by default, you can see an example here. border-spacing is the CSS property for cellpadding.

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