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I am trying to rename the existing file name with Kernel.txt on the basis of "Linux kernel Version" or "USB_STATE=DISCONNECTED". Script is running without any error but no output is coming. The changed file needs to be in the same folder(F1,F2,F3) as it was earlier.

Top dir: Log
 SubDir: F1,F2,F3
    F1: .bin file,.txt file,.jpg file
    F2: .bin file,.txt file,.jpg file
    F3: .bin file,.txt file,.jpg file

#!/usr/bin/perl 
use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Find;
use File::Basename;
use File::Spec;
use Cwd;
chdir('C:\\doc\\logs');
my $dir_01 = getcwd;

my $all_file=find ({ 'wanted' => \&renamefile }, $dir_01);
sub renamefile 
{
  if ( -f and /.txt?/ )
  {
   my @files = $_;
   foreach my $file (@files)
  {
    open (FILE,"<" ,$file) or die"Can not open the file";
    my @lines = <FILE>; 
    close FILE;
    for my $line ( @lines ) 
    {
       if($line=~ /Linux kernel Version/gi || $line=~ /USB_STATE=DISCONNECTED/gi)
       {    
         my $dirname = dirname($file); # file's directory, so we rename only the file itself.
         my $file_name = basename($file); # File name fore renaming.
         my $new_file_name = $file_name;
         $new_file_name =~ s/.* /Kernal.txt/g; # replace the name with Kernal.txt
         rename($file, File::Spec->catfile($dirname, $new_file_name)) or die $!; 
        }
     }
   }
  } 
 }
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This code looks a bit like cargo-cult programming. That is, some constructs are here without indication that you are understanding what this is doing.


chdir('C:\\doc\\logs');
my $dir_01 = getcwd;

Do yourself a favour and use forward slashes, even for Windows pathnames. This is generally supported.

Your directory diagram says that there is a top dir Log, yet you chdir to C:/doc/logs. What is it?

You do realize that $dir_01 is a very nondescriptive name, and is the path you just chdir'd to? Also, File::Find does not require you to start in the working directory. That is, the chdir is a bit useless here. You actually want:

my $start_directory = "C:/doc/Log"; # or whatever

my $all_file=find ({ 'wanted' => \&renamefile }, $dir_01);

I'm not sure what the return value of find would mean. But I'm sure that we don't have to put it into some unused variable.

When we provide key names with the => fat comma, we don't have to manually quote these keys. Therefore:

find({ wanted => \&renamefile }, $start_directory);

/.txt?/

This regex does the following:

  • match any character (that isn't a newline),
  • followed by literal tx,
  • and optionally a t. the ? is a zero-or-one quantifier.

If you want to match filenames that end with .txt, you should do

/\.txt$/

the \. matches a literal period. The $ anchors the regex at the end of the string.


my @files = $_;
foreach my $file (@files) {
  ...;
}

This would normally be written as

my $file = $_;
...;

You assign the value of $_ to the @files array, which then has one element: The $_ contents. Then you loop over this one element. Such loops don't deserve to be called loops.


open (FILE,"<" ,$file) or die"Can not open the file";
my @lines = <FILE>; 
close FILE;
for my $line ( @lines ) 
{ ... }

Ah, where to begin?

  1. Use lexical variables for file handles. These have the nice property of closing themselves.

  2. For error handling, use autodie. If you really want to do it yourself, the error message should contain two important pieces of information:

    • the name of the file you couldn't open ($file)
    • the reason why the open failed ($!)

    That would mean something like ... or die "Can't open $file: $!".

  3. Don't read the whole file into an array and loop over that. Instead, be memory-efficient and iterate over the lines, using a while(<>)-like loop. This only reads one line at a time, which is much better.

Combined, this would look like

use autodie; # at the top

open my $fh, "<", $file;
LINE: while (<$fh>) {
  ...; # no $line variable, let's use $_ instead
}

Oh, and I labelled the loop (with LINE) for later reference.


if($line=~ /Linux kernel Version/gi || $line=~ /USB_STATE=DISCONNECTED/gi) { ... }

Putting the /g flag on regexes turns them into an iterator. you really don't want that. And I'm not quite sure if that case-insensitive matching is really neccessary. You can move the || or into the regex, with the regex alternation |. As we now use $_ to contain the lines, we don't have to manually bind the regex to a string. Therefore, we can write:

if (/Linux Kernel Version|USB_STATE=DISCONNECTED/i) { ... }

my $dirname = dirname($file); # file's directory, so we rename only the file itself.
my $file_name = basename($file); # File name fore renaming.

The by default, the original $_, and therefore our $file, only contains the filename, but not the directory. This isn't a problem: File::Find chdir'd into the correct directory. This makes our processing a lot easier. If you want to have the directory, use the $File::Find::dir variable.


my $new_file_name = $file_name;
$new_file_name =~ s/.* /Kernal.txt/g;

The /.* / regex says:

  • match anything up to including the last space
  • If this matches, replace the matched part with Kernal.txt.

The /g flag is completely useless here. Are you sure you don't want Kernel.txt with an e? And why the space in the filename? I don't quite understand that. If you want to rename the file to Kernel.txt, just assign that as a string, instead of doing weird stuff with substitutions:

my $new_file_name = "Kernel.txt";

rename($file, File::Spec->catfile($dirname, $new_file_name)) or die $!; 

We already established that an error message should also include the filename, or even better: we should use automatic error handling.

Also, we are already in the correct directory, so we don't have to concatenate the new name with the directory.

rename $file => $new_file_name; # error handling by autodie
last LINE;

That should be enough. Also note that I leave the LINE loop. Once we renamed the file, there is no need to check the other lines as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for you such a nice expatiation . It is going to give me great help in future. here i have one doubt without closing the $fh can we rename the file. actually I tried but got error. –  Maverick Jul 25 '13 at 6:55
    
@Maverick Yes, some OSes (like Windows, I think) do require the filehandle to be closed before renaming. But that isn't difficult, just stick an explicit close $fh; before the rename. –  amon Jul 25 '13 at 7:00
    
one last question .. the same thing if i want to do with more then one file i mean different files then can it possible. –  Maverick Jul 25 '13 at 7:23
    
File::Find doesn't stop after the first rename. Inside your renamefile you are free to test for other conditions as well. –  amon Jul 25 '13 at 7:28

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