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#include <unistd.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>
int global;
int i = 30; 
int j = 30; 
int k = 30; 
pthread_mutex_t mutex;
void* child1(void* arg)
{
    while(k--)
    {   
        pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
        global++;
        printf("from child1\n");
        printf("%d\n",global);
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
    }   
}

void* child2(void* arg)
{
    while(j--)
    {   
        pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
        global++;
        printf("from child1\n");
        printf("%d\n",global);
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
    }   
}

int main()
{

    pthread_t tid1, tid2;
    pthread_mutex_init(&mutex, NULL);
    pthread_create(&tid1, NULL, child1, NULL);
    pthread_create(&tid2, NULL, child2, NULL);   
    while(i--)
    {
        pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
        global++;
        printf("from main\n");
        printf("%d\n",global);
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
    }
    return 0;
}

I'm new to pthread and multithreading, the result of this code is from main xx and child1 appeared rarely, the three threads never appear together, what's the problem?

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It isn't necessarily the case that printf() flushes output with a newline, and I have no idea how the underlying implementation of printf() works here, but before you go about jumping through the harder hoops, I'd recommend adding a fflush(stdout) to ensure that at each iteration for each thread the output buffer has been fully flushed in between critical sections and has no chance of being overwritten through some magical asynchronous happenstance. If the easy check doesn't pan out, then worry about other issues. –  user Jul 25 '13 at 12:48

3 Answers 3

Most of time in the critical sections will be spent in the printf calls. You might try:

{
    int local;

    pthread_mutex_lock(& mutex);
    local = ++global;
    pthread_mutex_unlock(& mutex);

    printf("from <fn>\n%d\n", local);
}

This still doesn't give any guarantee of 'fairness' however, but the printf call is very likely to use a system call or I/O event that will cause the scheduler to kick in.


Your program is similar to the Dining Philosophers Problem in many respects. You don't want any thread to 'starve', but you have contention between threads for the global counter, and you want to enforce an orderly execution.

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how can i ensure that all the three threads have been executed? –  nzomkxia Jul 25 '13 at 6:27
    
@nzomkxia - you can't. You will need some other pthread mechanism, maybe condition variables, or a queue structure that makes use of pthread_yield, etc. Look into the Dining Philosophers Problem. –  Brett Hale Jul 25 '13 at 6:40
    
The global counter here isn't a shared resource in the context of the problem, though - it's just getting incremented ad infinitum (there is no branch or calculation dependent on its value anywhere save for line output). Every thread has its own count-down, and the only resource they share is the mutex. I fail to see how this is similar to the dining philosophers problem. –  user Jul 25 '13 at 12:37
    
Also, iirc the C std lib isn't thread-safe, and that printf outside the critical section seems like it's asking for race conditions with the output buffer. –  user Jul 25 '13 at 12:51
    
@Atash - POSIX requires printf, fprintf, etc. - the stdio functions - to be thread-safe, and the operations to be atomic. These being POSIX threads, I don't see this being an issue. –  Brett Hale Jul 25 '13 at 13:09

One suggestion in code replace printf("from child1\n"); to printf("from child2\n"); in void* child2(void* arg) function. And if you want ensure all threads to complete please add the following lines at end of main function. pthread_join(tid1,NULL); pthread_join(tid2,NULL);

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I think you should use 3 differents mutex , by the way use pconditional control in order to avoid having unsafe access

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