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 int (*a)[5];

How can we Initialize a pointer to an array of 5 integers shown above.

Is the below expression correct ?

int (*a)[3]={11,2,3,5,6}; 
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There's never any good use for "pointer to array" in C. It just obscures the code for no benefit. Just declare and initialize the array, and use pointers to its element type. – Lee Daniel Crocker Jul 25 '13 at 7:06
4  
@LeeDanielCrocker: That's not true - a pointer to array is the most efficient way to dynamically allocate a multidimensional array (as in int (*a)[5] = malloc(nrows * sizeof *a);) – caf Jul 25 '13 at 7:24
    
Yeah, that is pretty simple, but that only applies when you know the inner dimension at compile time, not in the more general case. – Lee Daniel Crocker Jul 25 '13 at 8:08
2  
@LeeDanielCrocker: works just as well for VLAs: size_t cols; ...; int (*a)[cols] = malloc( nrows * sizeof *a );. It's also what a 2D array expression decays to when passed to a function. The OP's usage is incorrect, but that doesn't make them useless. – John Bode Jul 25 '13 at 9:57
up vote 11 down vote accepted

Suppose you have an array of int of length 5 e.g.

int x[5];

Then you can do a = &x;

 int x[5] = {1};
 int (*a)[5] = &x;

To access elements of array you: (*a)[i] (== (*(&x))[i]== (*&x)[i] == x[i]) parenthesis needed because precedence of [] operator is higher then *. (one common mistake can be doing *a[i] to access elements of array).

Understand what you asked in question is an compilation time error:

int (*a)[3] = {11, 2, 3, 5, 6}; 

It is not correct and a type mismatch too, because {11,2,3,5,6} can be assigned to int a[5]; and you are assigning to int (*a)[3].

Additionally,

You can do something like for one dimensional:

int *why = (int[2]) {1,2};

Similarly, for two dimensional try this(thanks @caf):

int (*a)[5] = (int [][5]){ { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 } , { 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 } };
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i wanna declare and initialize in one line... – EnterKEY Jul 25 '13 at 6:59
    
@Flow second not correct try ,as int (*a)[5]= (int(*)[5])&({11,2,3,5,6}); with new compiler – Grijesh Chauhan Jul 25 '13 at 7:07
1  
int (*a)[5] = (int [][5]){ { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 } , { 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 } }; – caf Jul 25 '13 at 7:27
1  
@GrijeshChauhan,@caf Thanks for Ur valuable info ... :-) – EnterKEY Jul 25 '13 at 9:21
1  
@GrijeshChauhan: you're most welcome – EnterKEY Jul 25 '13 at 14:37

{11,2,3,5,6} is an initializer list, it is not an array, so you can't point at it. An array pointer needs to point at an array, that has a valid memory location. If the array is a named variable or just a chunk of allocated memory doesn't matter.

It all boils down to the type of array you need. There are various ways to declare arrays in C, depending on purpose:

// plain array, fixed size, can be allocated in any scope
int array[5] = {11,2,3,5,6};
int (*a)[5] = &array;

// compound literal, fixed size, local scope only
int (*b)[5] = &(int[5]){11,2,3,5,6};

// dynamically allocated array, variable size possible
int (*c)[n] = malloc( sizeof(int[n]) );

// variable-length array, variable size
int n = 5;
int vla[n];
memcpy( vla, something, sizeof(int[n]) ); // always initialized in run-time
int (*d)[n] = &vla;
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int a1[5] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
int (*a)[5] = &a1;
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int vals[] = {1, 2};
int (*arr)[sizeof(vals)/sizeof(vals[0])] = &vals;

and then you access the content of the array as in:

(*arr)[0] = ...
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right, thank you for spotting the typo – Stefano Falasca Jul 25 '13 at 12:34

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