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I am trying to add a formatted column between columns of multiple text files. By using

awk 'NR==FNR{c[NR]=$3;l=NR;next}{$2=($3+c[1])*c[l]" "$2}7' file file

I can convert a file that has a form

1 2 3 4
10 20 30 40 
100 200 300 400

to

1 1800 3 4
10 9900 30 40
100 90900 300 400

How can I do above operation to multiple .dat files?

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1  
Do it in a for loop in your shell. –  Atropo Jul 25 '13 at 7:14
    
I know but how can I do that? –  Atoof Jul 25 '13 at 7:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
tmp="/usr/tmp/tmp$$"
for file in *
do
    awk '...' "$file" "$file" > "$tmp" && mv "$tmp" "$file"
done

wrt your script, though:

awk 'NR==FNR{c[NR]=$3;l=NR;next}{$2=($3+c[1])*c[l]" "$2}7' file file

Never use the letter l (el) as a variable name as it looks far too much like the number 1 (one). I'd actually write it as:

awk 'NR==FNR{c[++n]=$3;next}{$2=($3+c[1])*c[n]" "$2}7' file file

or if memory is a concern for a large file:

awk 'NR==FNR{c[NR==1]=$3;next}{$2=($3+c[1])*c[0]" "$2}7' file file
share|improve this answer
    
I used the following: tmp="../tmp$$"; for file in *.text; do awk 'NR==FNR{c[NR]=$3;l=NR;next}{$2=($3+c[1])*c[l]" "$2}7' "$file" > "$tmp" && mv "$tmp" "$file"; done. but it just delete the files. –  Atoof Jul 25 '13 at 8:00
    
yeah, it would. You forgot to specify the file twice on the arg list. –  Ed Morton Jul 25 '13 at 8:04
1  
+1 your answer is more complete than mine –  Atropo Jul 25 '13 at 8:12

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