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I have some static content on my web site that I have set up caching for (using Asp.NET MVC). According to Firebug, the first time I open the page, Firefox sends this request:

GET /CoreContent/Core.css?asm=0.7.3614.34951
Host: 127.0.0.1:3916
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 6.1; en-US; rv:1.9.1.5) Gecko/20091102 Firefox/3.5.5 (.NET CLR 3.5.30729)
Accept: text/css,*/*;q=0.1
Accept-Language: en-us,en;q=0.5
Accept-Encoding: gzip,deflate
Accept-Charset: ISO-8859-1,utf-8;q=0.7,*;q=0.7
Keep-Alive: 300
Connection: keep-alive
Referer: http://127.0.0.1:3916/Edit/1/101
Cookie: .ASPXAUTH=52312E5A802C1A079E2BA29AA2BFBC5A38058977B84452D62ED52855D4164659B4307661EC73A307BFFB2ED3871C67CB3A9AAFDB3A75A99AC0A21C63A6AADE9A11A7138C672E75125D9FF3EFFBD9BF62
Pragma: no-cache
Cache-Control: no-cache

Which my server replies to with this:

Server: ASP.NET Development Server/9.0.0.0
Date: Mon, 23 Nov 2009 18:44:41 GMT
X-AspNet-Version: 2.0.50727
X-AspNetMvc-Version: 1.0
Cache-Control: public, max-age=31535671
Expires: Tue, 23 Nov 2010 18:39:12 GMT
Last-Modified: Mon, 23 Nov 2009 18:39:12 GMT
Vary: *
Content-Type: text/css
Content-Length: 15006
Connection: Close

So far, so good. However, if I refresh Firefox (not a cache-clearing refresh, just a normal one), during that refresh cycle Firefox will once again go to the server with this request:

GET /CoreContent/Core.css?asm=0.7.3614.34951
Host: 127.0.0.1:3916
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 6.1; en-US; rv:1.9.1.5) Gecko/20091102 Firefox/3.5.5 (.NET CLR 3.5.30729)
Accept: text/css,*/*;q=0.1
Accept-Language: en-us,en;q=0.5
Accept-Encoding: gzip,deflate
Accept-Charset: ISO-8859-1,utf-8;q=0.7,*;q=0.7
Keep-Alive: 300
Connection: keep-alive
Referer: http://127.0.0.1:3916/Edit/1/101
Cookie: .ASPXAUTH=52312E5A802C1A079E2BA29AA2BFBC5A38058977B84452D62ED52855D4164659B4307661EC73A307BFFB2ED3871C67CB3A9AAFDB3A75A99AC0A21C63A6AADE9A11A7138C672E75125D9FF3EFFBD9BF62
If-Modified-Since: Mon, 23 Nov 2009 18:39:20 GMT
Cache-Control: max-age=0

to which my server responds 304 Not Modified.

Why does Firefox issue this second request? In the first response, I said that the cache does not expire for a year (I intend to use query parameters whenever things change). Do I have to add another response header to prevent this extra roundtrip?

Edit: It does not matter whether I press refresh, or whether I go to the page again (or a different URL, which references the same external files). Firefox does the same again. Also, I don't claim this to be a bug in FF, I just wonder if there is another header I can set which means "This document will never change, don't bother me again".

share|improve this question
    
I have noticed Cache-Control: no-cache and Cache-Control: no-cache: max-age=0 headers in GET requests. Maybe this is the problem? According to w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec13.html: When a client tries to revalidate a cache entry, and the response it receives contains a Date header that appears to be older than the one for the existing entry, then the client SHOULD repeat the request unconditionally, and include Cache-Control: max-age=0 ... –  Roman Nov 23 '09 at 22:35
    
Thanks, but those headers are sent from FF. The question is whether there is something I can do on the server to say "Trust me, this file won't ever change. Please don't bother me again." –  erikkallen Nov 24 '09 at 10:25
    
May I ask you why you are mentioning only FireFox but not other browsers behavior? Have you resolved described issue with these other browsers or you don't care about them at all? Truly saying I am also interested in this "cache forever" behavior, if it exists. Thanks. –  Roman Nov 24 '09 at 19:36
    
The reason I'm only mentioning Firefox is that I have only seen the behaviour in Firefox, because I have only checked Firefox. The reason for that is that Firebug makes it easy to se all FF net requests. And although I've tried fiddler/IE, I haven't made it work since I use localhost (or 127.0.0.1) as my server. –  erikkallen Nov 24 '09 at 19:41

2 Answers 2

This behavior seems to be "by design" for all modern browsers. In IE you can investigate the same situation. Hitting F5 always causes browser to check whether content was modified. During cache-clearing request browser do not pass Last-Modified header and server must return HTTP 200 (not HTTP 304), so 304 in your situation is not so bad.

share|improve this answer
    
So there is no way for the server to say "This file will never change. Don't bother me about it again if you don't absolutely need to"? –  erikkallen Nov 23 '09 at 19:20
    
I am not 100% sure, especially about all browser, but from my own experience I think the answer is "no way". If user does not hit F5 browser uses cached version. Main advice: do not forget about Last-Modified and ETag HTTP headers for the case when user hits F5, because otherwise static content will be reloaded which is much more expensive than 304 response. –  Roman Nov 23 '09 at 20:04
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Apparently, the issue was due to a Vary: * header being added to the response. To remove this in Asp.Net, add this to web.config inside the <system.web> section:

<caching>
    <outputCache omitVaryStar="true"/>
</caching>

To me it seems this switch is "yes, I want a working behaviour rather than a non-working one", but once you find it, flipping it is trivial.

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