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I'm trying to do a debug system but it seems not to work.

What I wanted to accomplish is something like this:

#ifndef DEBUG
    #define printd //
#else
    #define printd printf
#endif

Is there a way to do that? I have lots of debug messages and I won't like to do:

if (DEBUG)
    printf(...)

code

if (DEBUG)
    printf(...)

...

EDIT: I chose AndreyT's answer as it is the direct answer to my question, regarding what I'm doing instead of #defining a comment is explained by Tim's and Xeor's answers.

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1  
Direct duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1644868/… and probably others too. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 23 '09 at 19:45
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9 Answers 9

up vote 12 down vote accepted

No, you can't. Comments are removed from the code before any processing of preprocessor directives begin. For this reason you can't include comment into a macro.

Also, any attempts to "form" a comment later by using any macro trickery are not guaranteed to work. The compiler is not required to recognize "late" comments as comments.

The best way to implement what you want is to use macros with variable arguments in C99 (or, maybe, using the compiler extensions).

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С99 way:

#ifdef DEBUG
    #define printd(...) printf(__VA_ARGS__)
#else
    #define printd(...)
#endif

Well, this one doesn't require C99 but assumes compiler has optimization turned on for release version:

#ifdef DEBUG
    #define printd printf
#else
    #define printd if (1) {} else printf
#endif
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Correct, but not quite portable. –  Tim Post Nov 23 '09 at 19:04
    
Added portable way :) –  Xeor Nov 23 '09 at 19:10
    
Much better, but again the "portable" version does not disable the validity checks on the arguments. The proper way to do it in non-C99 implementation is given in Tim's answer. –  AndreyT Nov 23 '09 at 19:15
    
And that's its good side I think. Why disable validity check on code that will be real in debug versions? –  Xeor Nov 23 '09 at 19:15
    
Simple: because that code might be invalid in release versions. There's nothing wrong with debug code being invalid in release. Moreover, that's the way it is most of the time. –  AndreyT Nov 23 '09 at 19:19
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A common trick is to do this:

#ifdef DEBUG
  #define OUTPUT(x) printf x
#else
  #define OUTPUT(x)
#endif

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void)
{   
  OUTPUT(("%s line %i\n", __FILE__, __LINE__));

  return 0;
}

This way you have the whole power of printf() available to you, but you have to put up with the double brackets to make the macro work.

The point of the double brackets is this: you need one set to indicate that it's a macro call, but you can't have an indeterminate number of arguments in a macro in C89. However, by putting the arguments in their own set of brackets they get interpreted as a single argument. When the macro is expanded when DEBUG is defined, the replacement text is the word printf followed by the singl argument, which is actually several items in brackets. The brackets then get interpreted as the brackets needed in the printf function call, so it all works out.

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why not use printf(x) in the 1st macro ? wouldn't work ? –  Keats Nov 23 '09 at 19:53
1  
Good question. Now explained in the answer text. –  Tim Nov 23 '09 at 20:43
    
also, you could use OUTPUT(x...) printf(x) to avoid double (). –  Brian Postow Nov 23 '09 at 22:25
1  
@Brian This wouldn't work if you wanted variable numbers of arguments. See explanatory text for details. –  Tim Nov 24 '09 at 7:42
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You can put all your debug call in a function, let call it printf_debug and put the DEBUG inside this function. The compiler will optimize the empty function.

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Thank you, sanity at last .. except its mostly the work of the preprocessor. –  Tim Post Nov 23 '09 at 19:01
    
In this case you could just call your function printd –  tadman Nov 23 '09 at 19:02
1  
That does not not disable the evaluation of arguments and does not disable the requirement for the arguments to be valid (like, declared, for example). In other words, it doesn't do what was requested. –  AndreyT Nov 23 '09 at 19:10
    
@AndreyT, if any kind of link time optimization is done, the compiler will inline empty functions and remove dead code for evaluating arguments. –  Jay Conrod Nov 23 '09 at 19:11
1  
The problem is that it simply will not compile if the arguments are not valid in release context. It won't get to "optimization". –  AndreyT Nov 23 '09 at 19:21
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The standard way is to use

#ifndef DEBUG
    #define printd(fmt, ...)  do { } while(0)
#else
    #define printd(fmt, ...) printf(fmt, __VA_ARGS__)
#endif

That way, when you add a semi-colon on the end, it does what you want. As there is no operation the compiler will compile out the "do...while"

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2  
Uh, no. That code won’t work at all. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 23 '09 at 19:01
    
with braces it would work –  Keats Nov 23 '09 at 19:52
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As noted by McKay, you will run into problems if you simply try to replace printd with //. Instead, you could use variadric macros to replace printd with a function that does nothing as in the following.

#ifndef DEBUG
    #define printd(...) do_nothing()
#else
    #define printd(...) printf(__VA_ARGS__)
#endif

void do_nothing() { ; }

Using a debugger like GDB might help too, but sometimes a quick printf is enough.

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I use this construct a lot:

#define DEBUG 1
#if DEBUG
#if PROG1
#define DEBUGSTR(msg...)    	{ printf("P1: "); printf( msg); }
#else
#define DEBUGSTR(msg...)    	{ printf("P2: "); printf( msg); }
#endif
#else
#define DEBUGSTR(msg...)    ((void) 0)
#endif

This way I can tell in my console which program is giving which error message... also, I can search easily for my error messages...

Personally, I don't like #defining just part of an expression...

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It's been done. I don't recommend it. No time to test but the mechanism is kind of like this:

 #define printd_CAT(x) x ## x
 #ifndef DEBUG
    #define printd printd_CAT(/)
 #else
    #define printd printf
 #endif

This works if your compiler processes // comments in the compiler itself (there's no guarantee like the ANSI guarantee that there are two passes for /* comments).

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Untested: Edit: Tested, using it by myself by now :)

#define DEBUG 1
#define printd(fmt,...) if(DEBUG)printf(fmt, __VA_ARGS__)

requires you to not only define DEBUG but also give it a non-zer0 value.

Appendix: Also works well with std::cout

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