Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Please see the code below that writes XML out to file a simple class containing a list of 3 objects. The 3 objects in the list descend from each other, Base, Derived1, Derived2. I use XMLArrayItemAttributes to override the names during Serialization. This works fine in .NET 3.0, but now outputs a different result in .NET 4.0. Please see the below Outputs, noting specifically the second descendant item DerivedItem2.

Has anyone any experience with this and how I might fix it to work in .NET 4.0 as it did in v3.5?

It seems that I cannot control the order in which the array items are overridden. It doesn't appear to be the order in which they are added to the XMLArrayItems.

Edit: I've just tried the same example using MONO against framework versions 4.0 and 4.5 and it works fine with those. Could this just be a bug with the Microsoft framework versions?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Collections;
using System.Xml.Serialization;
using System.Xml;
using System.Xml.Schema;
using System.IO;


namespace WindowsFormsApplication1
{
public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        TestGroup g = new TestGroup();
        XmlSerializer s = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TestGroup), g.GetOverrides());
        TextWriter w = new StreamWriter("c:\\#\\test.xml");
        s.Serialize(w, g);
        w.Close();
    }
}


public class TestGroup
{
    public List<BaseItem> Items { get; set; }

    public TestGroup()
    {
        Items = new List<BaseItem>();
        BaseItem b = new BaseItem();
        b.BaseName = "Base Name";
        Items.Add(b);
        DerivedItem d1 = new DerivedItem();
        d1.BaseName = "D1";
        d1.DerivedName = "D1";
        Items.Add(d1);
        DerivedItem2 d2 = new DerivedItem2();
        d2.BaseName = "D2";
        //d2.DerivedName = "D2";
        d2.Derived2Name = "D2";
        Items.Add(d2);
    }


    public XmlAttributeOverrides GetOverrides()
    {
        XmlAttributes atts = new XmlAttributes();

        for (int i = 0; i < Items.Count; i++)
        {
            BaseItem b = Items[i];
            Type ItemType = b.GetType();

            XmlArrayItemAttribute ItemAtt = new XmlArrayItemAttribute();

            ItemAtt.ElementName = ItemType.Name;
            ItemAtt.Type = ItemType;
            atts.XmlArrayItems.Add(ItemAtt);
        }

        XmlAttributeOverrides attOvers = new XmlAttributeOverrides();
        attOvers.Add(typeof(TestGroup), "Items", atts);

        return attOvers;
    }

}
public class BaseItem : IXmlSerializable
{
    public string BaseName;

    public XmlSchema GetSchema()
    {
        return null;
    }

    public void ReadXml(XmlReader reader)
    {
        // not required for example
    }

    public virtual void WriteXml(XmlWriter writer)
    {
        writer.WriteElementString("BaseName", this.BaseName);
    }
}
public class DerivedItem: BaseItem
{
    public string DerivedName;

    public override void WriteXml(XmlWriter writer)
    {
        base.WriteXml(writer);
        writer.WriteElementString("DerivedName", this.DerivedName);
    }
}
public class DerivedItem2: DerivedItem
{
    public string Derived2Name;

    public override void WriteXml(XmlWriter writer)
    {
        base.WriteXml(writer);
        writer.WriteElementString("Derived2Name", this.Derived2Name);
    }
}

Output Original (.NET 3.0):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<TestGroup xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <Items>
    <BaseItem>
      <BaseName>Base Name</BaseName>
    </BaseItem>
    <DerivedItem>
      <BaseName>D1</BaseName>
      <DerivedName>D1</DerivedName>
    </DerivedItem>
    <DerivedItem2>
      <BaseName>D2</BaseName>
      <DerivedName />
      <Derived2Name>D2</Derived2Name>
    </DerivedItem2>
  </Items>
</TestGroup>

Output Changed (.NET 4.0):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<TestGroup xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <Items>
    <BaseItem>
      <BaseName>Base Name</BaseName>
    </BaseItem>
    <DerivedItem>
      <BaseName>D1</BaseName>
      <DerivedName>D1</DerivedName>
    </DerivedItem>
    <DerivedItem> 
      <BaseName>D2</BaseName>
      <DerivedName />
      <Derived2Name>D2</Derived2Name>
    </DerivedItem>
  </Items>
</TestGroup>

Update: Output from .NET 4.5

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<TestGroup xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <Items>
    <BaseItem>
      <BaseName>Base Name</BaseName>
    </BaseItem>
    <BaseItem>
      <BaseName>D1</BaseName>
      <DerivedName>D1</DerivedName>
    </BaseItem>
    <DerivedItem2>
      <BaseName>D2</BaseName>
      <DerivedName />
      <Derived2Name>D2</Derived2Name>
    </DerivedItem2>
  </Items>
</TestGroup>

Update: Turning on the debugging switch in the app.config as below, referenced from http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa302290.aspx , I find that the order in which the Serialization applies the overrides is different to the order in which I fill the override array. Anyone any idea how this order is determined or overridden?

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
    <system.diagnostics>
        <switches>
            <add name="XmlSerialization.Compilation" value="4" />
        </switches>
    </system.diagnostics>
</configuration>

This gives me a c# output file which shows the override order as incorrect:

void Write2_TestGroup(string n, string ns, global::WindowsFormsApplication1.TestGroup o, bool isNullable, bool needType) {
    if ((object)o == null) {
        if (isNullable) WriteNullTagLiteral(n, ns);
        return;
    }
    if (!needType) {
        System.Type t = o.GetType();
        if (t == typeof(global::WindowsFormsApplication1.TestGroup)) {
        }
        else {
            throw CreateUnknownTypeException(o);
        }
    }
    WriteStartElement(n, ns, o, false, null);
    if (needType) WriteXsiType(@"TestGroup", @"");
    {
        global::System.Collections.Generic.List<global::WindowsFormsApplication1.BaseItem> a = (global::System.Collections.Generic.List<global::WindowsFormsApplication1.BaseItem>)((global::System.Collections.Generic.List<global::WindowsFormsApplication1.BaseItem>)o.@Items);
        if (a != null){
            WriteStartElement(@"Items", @"", null, false);
            for (int ia = 0; ia < ((System.Collections.ICollection)a).Count; ia++) {
                global::WindowsFormsApplication1.BaseItem ai = (global::WindowsFormsApplication1.BaseItem)a[ia];
                if ((object)(ai) != null){
                    if (ai is global::WindowsFormsApplication1.DerivedItem) {
                        WriteSerializable((System.Xml.Serialization.IXmlSerializable)((global::WindowsFormsApplication1.DerivedItem)ai), @"DerivedItem", @"", true, true);
                    }
                    else if (ai is global::WindowsFormsApplication1.BaseItem) {
                        WriteSerializable((System.Xml.Serialization.IXmlSerializable)((global::WindowsFormsApplication1.BaseItem)ai), @"BaseItem", @"", true, true);
                    }
                    else if (ai is global::WindowsFormsApplication1.DerivedItem2) {
                        WriteSerializable((System.Xml.Serialization.IXmlSerializable)((global::WindowsFormsApplication1.DerivedItem2)ai), @"DerivedItem2", @"", true, true);
                    }
                    else  if ((object)(ai) != null){
                        throw CreateUnknownTypeException(ai);
                    }
                }
            }
            WriteEndElement();
        }
    }
    WriteEndElement(o);
}
share|improve this question
    
Yeah, this seems weird. Have you tried with .net 4.5? The order the type of ai is checked should just be from the most specialised to the most generalised type, according to my thinking. Anything else doesn't make sense as it'll never output the right type name in the enclosing XML and therefore deserialising isn't going to work. Have you tried deserialising the generated XML? Do you get the same behaviour if you don't override WriteXml()? –  Rory Aug 9 '13 at 22:11
    
There might be some finicky aspect to the serialiser, e.g. have you tried ensuring your derived classes all have a ReadXml() method? –  Rory Aug 9 '13 at 22:12
    
Thanks for the comments Rory. I've tried a few combinations of including/excluding ReadXml/WriteXml and it still seems to give the same base element names. Also tried it with .NET 4.5 in both legacy mode and not but still no difference. –  Pat Buxton Aug 12 '13 at 8:05
    
Can you get the same symptoms when you remove WriteXml and GetSchema and use attributes instead of GetOverrides() to control serializing Items? i.e. just using default serialization with no overrides. If so then it seems like a clear XmlSerializer bug as it wouldn't be possible to deserialize from the generated XML, and you're left with raising a bug with MS. If that doesn't generate the problem then build it up from there to your current replication code and see where the problem appears. I suspect something in GetOverrides() is the culprit. –  Rory Aug 12 '13 at 10:34
    
If I remove the overrides then all the items in the Items list is tagged as <BaseItem>, which I would expect as the list is defined as List<BaseItem>. The overrides are then provided to serialize the particular object types in the list as the correct types. The WriteXML is only used to write out the properties for the object types which is working correctly. –  Pat Buxton Aug 12 '13 at 11:29
add comment

1 Answer

Well Pat,

I have managed to reproduce the same problem when testing your code in .Net4 and than changing to .Net4.5...

In .Net4.5 the output seems the same as what you quoted for .Net3

So just go ahead and skip .Net4 and instead just use .Net4.5

Reason to this problem is originated to how objects are constructed in memory in the frameworks. In .net4 they probably being held from "base" to "derived" and in .Net3 and .Net4.5 they are held (more correctly in my opinion and it is a matter of opinion) from "derived" to "base". Being more specific on that, I believe that in:

.Net4 the framework stores the object instance as type of base with pointer to derived instance.

.Net4.5/.Net3 the framework stores the object instance as type of derived with pointers to base instance.

In both cases you end up getting the same result when working with the object in regular scenarios.

I do remember reading that garbage collecting had some improvements in .net4.5 and I believe this is just part of the things the MS devs changed to optimize the performance.

In both tests I worked with the same version of XML Serializer (4.0)

share|improve this answer
    
G.Y, sorry I've not looked at this question for a while. Thanks for the information. I'm fairly certain I tested with .NET 4.5 as per my comment on original question (Aug 12). I'll have to go back and retry this. I will get back to you shortly. –  Pat Buxton Oct 4 '13 at 14:02
    
I've just run the app under .NET 4.5, please see edit to original question with the result. Whilst it is a different result, it is still not fixed. –  Pat Buxton Oct 4 '13 at 15:04
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.