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When I debug my project, and a CEdit object's text is changed, I want to see the new value. But the watch window doesn't display a text member.
Where the text is stored?

EDIT: I forgot to write that I use Visual C++ 6.0 ('98 edition)

The tree of CEdit in the watch window seems as this:

m_editBox
|  
+ [CWnd]  
  |  
  + CCmdTarget  
  + classCWnd
  + m_hWnd  
  + wndTop
  + wndBottom
  + wndTopMost
  + wndNoTopMost
  + m_hWndOwner
  - m_nFlags
  - m_pfnSuper
  - m_nMsgDragList
  - m_nModalResult
  + m_pDropTarget
  + m_pCtrlCont
  + m_pCtrlSite
  + _messageEntries
  + messageMap
+ CWnd
  |
  + CCmdTarget
  + m_hWnd
  + m_hWndOwner
  - m_nFlags
  - m_pfnSuper
  - m_nModalResult
  + m_pDropTarget
  - m_pCtrlCont
  - m_pCtrlSite
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To answer your question where a window's text is stored upfront: I don't really know, and neither does any given window. To get to that information you would have to ask the window manager instead.

All information pertaining to a window is stored in an internal structure maintained by the window manager. The window manager is implemented by Win32k.sys and consequently those internal structures reside in kernel memory. A HWND serves as an index into a table controlled by the window manager. Even though the table entries are mapped read-only into user-space memory it is fairly tedious to get the information you want.

So far, so bad. However not all is lost yet. You can still get the information you need.

The easiest option would be to use Spy++ (Spyxx.exe). It ships as part Visual Studio and helps in retrieving window specific information, among other aspects it will show a window's text. Given your requirements you would go to Spy -> Find Window... (or press [Ctrl]+F) and enter the window's handle (in hex without the 0x-prefix). The information however does not automatically refresh. You need to click the Refresh button manually.

If you want real-time information inside Visual Studio's debugger you would have to write a debugger expression evaluation addin. Expression evaluators are not officially supported by Microsoft. As such there is no official documentation. How to write a custom native visualizer DLL for Visual Studio 2012 debugger? provides helpful information if you want to go down that route. An expression evaluator displaying a window's text entry would look like this:

HwndEEAddin.h:

// HwndEEAddin.h : main header file for the NatvisAddIn DLL
//

#if !defined( INC_HWNDEEADDIN_H_ )
#define INC_HWNDEEADDIN_H_

#pragma once

#define WIN32_LEAN_AND_MEAN             // Exclude rarely-used stuff from Windows headers
#include <windows.h>


#define ADDIN_API extern "C" __declspec(dllexport)

/* DebugHelper structure used from within the */
typedef struct tagDEBUGHELPER
{
  DWORD dwVersion;
  BOOL (WINAPI *ReadDebuggeeMemory)( struct tagDEBUGHELPER *pThis, DWORD dwAddr, DWORD nWant, VOID* pWhere, DWORD *nGot );
  // from here only when dwVersion >= 0x20000
  unsigned __int64 (WINAPI *GetRealAddress)( struct tagDEBUGHELPER *pThis );
  BOOL (WINAPI *ReadDebuggeeMemoryEx)( struct tagDEBUGHELPER *pThis, unsigned __int64 qwAddr, DWORD nWant, VOID* pWhere, DWORD *nGot );
  int (WINAPI *GetProcessorType)( struct tagDEBUGHELPER *pThis );
} DEBUGHELPER;

/* Exported Functions */
ADDIN_API HRESULT WINAPI AddIn_HWND( DWORD dwAddress, DEBUGHELPER *pHelper, int nBase, BOOL bUniStrings, char *pResult, size_t maxResult, DWORD reserved );

#endif  // !defined( INC_HWNDEEADDIN_H_ )

HwndEEAddin.cpp:

#include "HwndEEAddin.h"

#include <strsafe.h>


ADDIN_API HRESULT WINAPI AddIn_HWND( DWORD dwAddress, DEBUGHELPER* pHelper, int /*nBase*/, BOOL bUniStrings, char *pResult, size_t maxResult, DWORD /*reserved*/ )
{
  HRESULT hr = E_FAIL;

  HWND hWnd = reinterpret_cast< HWND >( dwAddress );
  if ( hWnd != NULL )
  {
    bool bGotWindowText = false;

    CHAR asciiWindowText[ 128 ] = { 8 };
    if ( IsWindowUnicode( hWnd ) )
    {
      WCHAR buffer[ 128 ] = { 0 };
      if ( GetWindowTextW( hWnd, buffer, ARRAYSIZE( buffer ) ) )
      {
        if ( WideCharToMultiByte( CP_THREAD_ACP, 0x0, buffer, -1, asciiWindowText, ARRAYSIZE( asciiWindowText ), NULL, NULL ) > 0 )
        {
          bGotWindowText = true;
        }
      }
    }
    else
    {
      if ( GetWindowTextA( hWnd, asciiWindowText, ARRAYSIZE( asciiWindowText ) ) )
      {
        bGotWindowText = true;
      }
    }

    if ( bGotWindowText )
    {
      hr = StringCbPrintfA( pResult, maxResult, "{pText=\"%s\"}", asciiWindowText );
    }
  }

  return hr;
}

To register the addin in Visual Studio 2010 and above you have to copy the .dll alongside the following file to %USERPROFILE%\Documents\Visual Studio 2012\Visualizers.

HwndEEAddin.natvis:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<AutoVisualizer xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/vstudio/debugger/natvis/2010">

  <!-- Place this file and the AddIn-DLL to this folder: %USERPROFILE%\My Documents\Visual Studio 2012\Visualizers\ -->

  <Type Name="HWND__">
    <DisplayString LegacyAddin="HwndEEAddin.dll" Export="_AddIn_HWND@28"></DisplayString>
  </Type>

</AutoVisualizer>

In Visual Studio versions prior to 2010 you have to edit autoexp.dat by adding the following entry to the [AutoExpand] section:

HWND__ = $ADDIN(HwndEEAddin.dll,_AddIn_HWND@28)

The .dll must be in the devenv.exe directory or on the PATH. Otherwise you will have to use the fully qualified path name. Additional information for Visual Studio Expression Evaluators prior to VS 2010 can be found at Customizing the Visual Studio Debugger Display of Your Data.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Can you explain why is it so important to hide so simple information? Why won't the MFC object carry it? –  Aharon Jul 28 '13 at 6:03
1  
@Aharon CWnd-derived classes are a thin wrapper around HWND, the native handle to identify windows. The information and layout of the underlying structure (WND) is not exposed to client code to implement a layer of abstraction. It allows Microsoft to change the internal WND structure at any time without breaking client code, that accesses the public API (GetWindowText in this case). Abstraction is the process of hiding complexity, which is a good thing from a system architect's point of view, however unfortunate it may appear to a developer who wants to see those details. –  IInspectable Jul 28 '13 at 11:52

The actual text is held in the control's somehow associated memory which is not directly accessible to you. You only have control's handle HWND wrapped into CEdit class. In order to get text from there you need to do from code CEdit::GetWindowText well in advance into local memory, and then inspect it with the debugger.

share|improve this answer
    
While debugging I have no call to GetWindowText, so I can't execute it. In addition, I have no problem to use memory window, but I have to know where am I supposed to watch in. –  Aharon Jul 25 '13 at 11:07
    
The point is that Watch window won't show it. It shows you data from the class pointer down to m_hWnd member, and text is yet "behind" it. –  Roman R. Jul 25 '13 at 11:10
    
I understood it. But I don't know where in m_hWnd I'll find it, since watch window only shows unused with an int value. If I watch in memory I want to know the offset I should use from the m_hWnd's pointed address. –  Aharon Jul 25 '13 at 11:18
1  
The text is managed by the EDIT control and not by the CEdit instance. The CEdit instance is a wrapper around the Windows EDIT control. I don't know how many more times Roman needs to tell you, but the CEdit control does not hold the text. It has to obtain it on demand. Any decent debugger will invoke a method for you in a watch window or evaluate dialog. –  David Heffernan Jul 25 '13 at 11:28
1  
The only thing that knows where it is stored is the code in the Win32 library that implements the EDIT control. No MFC object knows where the string is stored. –  David Heffernan Jul 25 '13 at 11:43

If you want to see the new value, then you have to use a variable and retrieve the text from the window.

CString text;
GetDlgItemText(ID, text);
share|improve this answer
    
It's not what I asked. I'm now in debug time, want to find through debug windows the text value. If I can't find it in watch, instruct me where I will be able to. –  Aharon Jul 25 '13 at 11:24
1  
You can't!. That's the point. The text is stored in the window, not in the MFC object of type CEdit that wraps an edit control. You could use Spy to watch the window. It will show you the text. –  Marius Bancila Jul 25 '13 at 11:28
    
What's the problem with using GetDlgItemText ? YOU are in charge, YOU are debugging and YOU can put GetDlgItemText in YOUR program while your are debugging it. –  Michael Walz Jul 26 '13 at 6:42

CEdit's "GetWindowText" method LITERALLY sends a Windows Message to get the text, not a function call with simple accessor methods to the text.. The m_hWnd is a "handle" to some data structure within the deep internals of the O/S where only the window's O/S code knows how to retrieve the text.

I wish it was simpler, but MFC is just a wrapper around the Win32 API. You might try using C#, it does a better job of presenting the UI as objects (vs. wrappers around indirectly accessed C/Pascal/assembly structures)

share|improve this answer
    
CEdit's GetWindowText calls ::GetWindowText. This may or may not send a message. If it does not send a message it will - technically - invoke a simple accessor to the text. –  IInspectable Jul 28 '13 at 1:31

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