Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am playing around with Support Vector Machines in the R-Language. Specifically I am using the e1071 package.

As long as I follow the manual pages or the tutorial at wikibooks everythings works. But if I try to use my own datasets with those examples things aren't that good anymore.

It seems that the model creation fails for some reason. At least I am not getting the levels on the target column. Below you find the example for clarification.

Maybe someone can help me to figure out what I am doing wrong here. So here is all the code and data.

Test dataset

target,col1,col2
0,1,2
0,2,3
0,3,4
0,4,5
0,5,6
0,1,2
0,2,3
0,3,4
0,4,5
0,5,6
0,1,2
0,2,3
0,3,4
0,4,5
1,6,7
1,7,8
1,8,9
1,9,0
1,0,10
1,6,7
1,7,8
1,8,9
1,9,0
1,0,10
1,6,7
1,7,8
1,8,9
1,9,0
1,0,10

R-Script

library(e1071)

dataset <- read.csv("test.csv", header=TRUE, sep=',')

tuned <- tune.svm(target~., data = dataset, gamma = 10^(-6:-1), cost = 10^(-1:1))

summary(tuned)

model  <- svm(target~., data = dataset, kernel="radial", gamma=0.001, cost=10)

summary(model)

Output of the summary(model) statement

+ summary(model)

Call:
svm(formula = target ~ ., data = dataset, kernel = "radial", gamma = 0.001, 
    cost = 10)

Parameters:
   SVM-Type:  eps-regression 
 SVM-Kernel:  radial 
       cost:  10 
      gamma:  0.001 
    epsilon:  0.1 

Number of Support Vectors:  28
>

Wikibooks examaple

If I compare this output to the output of the wikibooks example, it's missing some information. Please notice the "Levels"-Section in the output:

library(MASS)
library(e1071)
data(cats)
model  <- svm(Sex~., data = cats)
summary(model)

Output

> summary(model)

Call:
svm(formula = Sex ~ ., data = cats)

Parameters:
   SVM-Type:  C-classification 
 SVM-Kernel:  radial 
       cost:  1 
      gamma:  0.5 

Number of Support Vectors:  84

 ( 39 45 )

Number of Classes:  2 

Levels: 
 F M
share|improve this question
    
Sex is probably a factor, but target is numeric. –  Roland Jul 25 '13 at 10:46
    
Thx, that did the trick. If I change the values to x/y instead of 0/1 it works. Either in the dataset or on the fly in R with dataset$target <- as.factor(dataset$target) dataset$target[dataset$target == 0] <- "x" dataset$target[dataset$target == 1] <- "y" –  user2618176 Jul 25 '13 at 10:57
    
factor has a levels parameter. –  Roland Jul 25 '13 at 12:33
add comment

1 Answer

Putting Roland's answer in the proper "answer" format:

target is numeric

sex is a factor

Let me give a few more suggestions:

  • it seems as if target really should be a factor. (It has only 2 levels, 0 & 1, and I suspect you're trying to classify into either 0 or 1.) So stick in a dataset$target <- factor(dataset$target) somewhere.
  • right now, because target is a numeric, a regression model is being run instead of a classification.
  • it's worthwhile to do a similar check for any of your variables before running a model (especially a model). In the case you gave, for instance, it's not obvious what col1 and col2 are. If either of them are a grouping or classification, you should also make them factors, too.
    • In R, many functions have multiple ways in which they will run, depending upon the data types fed to them. If you feed factors into a model, it will run classification. If you feed numerics, regression. This is actually common in many programming languages, and is called function overloading.
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.