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public interface A
{
}
public interface B
{
}
public interface C : A, B
{
}
public class Foo : C
{
}
        IUnityContainer unity = new UnityContainer();
        unity.RegisterType<A, Foo>(new TransientLifetimeManager(), new InjectionFactory(container => { throw new Exception(); }));
        unity.RegisterType<B, Foo>(new TransientLifetimeManager(), new InjectionFactory(container => { throw new Exception(); }));
        unity.Resolve<A>(); //uses RegisterType<B, Foo> InjectionFactory

I expected Unity to use "A" InjectionFactory.

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Interesting and I'd say it is a bug or at least doesn't work as expected. Using named registrations seems to resolve the issue however this could be not what you want. –  Wiktor Zychla Jul 25 '13 at 12:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Unity only maintains one build plan per build key so the second registration is overwriting the first registration (for Foo).

When registering, first a mapping is created between A and Foo and second it applies any injection members to the target type (Foo) based on the build key (Type: Foo, Name: null).

So, the mapping between A and Foo is separate from the injection members applied to Foo.

To illustrate more clearly the overwriting of the registration, I believe that the following is functionally equivalent to your configuration:

unity.RegisterType<Foo>(new TransientLifetimeManager(), 
    new InjectionFactory(container => { throw new Exception(); }));

unity.RegisterType<Foo>(new TransientLifetimeManager(), 
    new InjectionFactory(container => { throw new Exception(); }));

unity.RegisterType<A, Foo>();

In general, if you need different injection members applied to the same concrete type then you will need to use named registrations.

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