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I am new to this site, so I really hope I will provide all the necessary information regarding my question.

I've been trying to create a "new message arrived notification" using long polling. Currently I am initiating the polling request by window.onLoad event of each page in my site.

On the server side I have an infinite loop:

while(1){
 if(NewMessageArrived($current_user))break;
 sleep(10);
}
echo $newMessageCount;

On the client side I have the following (simplified) ajax functions:

poll_new_messages(){
 xmlhttp=GetXmlHttpObject();
 //...
 xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=got_new_message_count;
 //...
 xmlhttp.send();
}

got_new_message_count(){
 if (xmlhttp.readyState==4){
  updateMessageCount(xmlhttp.responseText);
  //...
  poll_new_messages();
 }
}

The problem is that with each page load, the above loop starts again. The result is multiple infinite loops for each user that eventually make my server hang.

*The NewMessageArived() function queries MySQL DB for new unread messages.

*At the beginning of the php script I run start_session() in order to obtain the $current_user value.

I am currently the only user of this site so it is easy for me to debug this behavior by writing time() to a file inside this loop. What I see is that the file is being written more often than once in 10 seconds, but it starts only when I go from page to page.

Please let me know if any additional information might help.

Thank you.

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3 Answers 3

I think I found a solution to my problem. I would appreciate if anyone could tell, if this is the technique that is being used in COMET and how scalable this solution.

I used a user based semaphore like this:

$sem_id = sem_get($current_user);
sem_acquire($sem_id);
while(1){
 if(NewMessageArrived($current_user))break;
 sleep(10);
}
sem_release($sem_id);
echo $newMessageCount;
share|improve this answer

It seems common for long-polling requests to timeout after 30 seconds. So in your while loop you could echo 'CLOSE' after 30 seconds.

while(!$new_message && $timer < 30){
    $new_message = NewMessageArrived($current_user);
    if(!$new_message) {
    	sleep(10);
    	$timer += 10;
    }
}
if($newMessageCount) {
    echo $newMessageCount;
} else {
    echo 'CLOSE';
}


In the Javascript, you can listen for the CLOSE.

function poll_new_messages(){
    xmlhttp=GetXmlHttpObject();
    //...
    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=got_new_message_count;
    //...
    xmlhttp.send();
}

function got_new_message_count(){
    if (xmlhttp.readyState==4){
    	if(xmlhttp.responseText != 'CLOSE') {
    		updateMessageCount(xmlhttp.responseText);
    	}
    	//...
    	poll_new_messages();
    }
}

Now, the PHP will return a response within 30 seconds, no matter what. If you use stays on the page, and you receive a CLOSE, you just don't update the count on the page, and re-ask.

If the user moves to a new page, your PHP instance will stop the loop regardless within 30 seconds, and return a response. Being on a new page though, the XHR that cared about that connection no longer exists, so it won't start up another loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. My ajax function poll_new_messages() has a response handler got_new_message_count() function. The response handler calls for poll_new_messages(), when triggered. So in both cases I will end up with the same amount of infinite loops or without a response handling function (if on CLOSE I won't call for poll_new_messages again). –  fibonacci Nov 23 '09 at 21:27
    
in the Javascript you can check for "CLOSE", and if so, re-poll. otherwise, display the count. If the user changes pages, when the loop times out, it wont get restarted from your handler, because the handler is no longer listening (from that page). –  seanmonstar Nov 24 '09 at 0:05
    
What happens then when another $newMessageCount arrives again, there is no handler for this event? The solution you are proposing will only notify the user once (in case the user won't change a page and start long-polling again). –  fibonacci Nov 24 '09 at 6:43
    
editted to show what you could do in the JS, and tried to better explain everything in my comments –  seanmonstar Nov 24 '09 at 23:16
    
Long polling requests timeout after X seconds if X was set with set_time_limit(X). So this is not a problem. In my opinion the idea of long polling is to allow it to be longer than 30 seconds and even if it is only 30 seconds I prefer one single thread running for each user and not one thread per page switch. –  fibonacci Nov 25 '09 at 18:47

You might try checking connection_aborted() periodically. Note that connection_aborted() might not pick up on the fact that the connection has in fact been aborted until you've written some output and done a flush().

In fact, just producing some output periodically may be sufficient for php to notice the connection close itself, and automatically kill your script.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. Won't this solution trigger the ajax response function each time I echo some data? Making this solution a regular polling and not long-polling. –  fibonacci Nov 23 '09 at 21:20

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