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This sounds like homework, yes it is (of someone else), i ask a friend of mine who is learning C# to lend me some of his class exercises to get the hang of it.

This is actually the first time i ever put hands to write C# code, i didn't even did a "hello world". But thats not the problem.

The problem are Palindromic numbers, don't remember learning about it, i only knew them at Wikipedia.

So as the Question title says it. How could i write a code that would check for these kind of numbers.

I'm not asking for C# source code (although its very useful), but i would be more happy that someone had the time to explain how should the code behave and work to search for these number, those principles that should work for most programming languages in searching for these numbers.

Thanks guys.


The Solution:

First i must say that this is the first question where i found a big effort and fun from all the community in this question. I really like that :D

Thanks for that. Well "statikfx", searched in SO for this (i did too but no good), and he found the solution.

 n = num;
 while (num > 0)
 {
      dig = num % 10;
      rev = rev * 10 + dig;
      num = num / 10;
 }
// If (n == rev) then num is a palindrome

I could post the C# code, but as i first said my gold as having a solution for all languages. And this its just that.

I think this is a more simple and lighter solution, and so far it as got it right.

My thanks to all you guys. Just Great.

share|improve this question
1  
Do you want to check if a number is a palindrome, or actually search for palindromic numbers within a much larger number? The difference is a few lines of code (if that) to many more. –  user10789 Nov 23 '09 at 20:55
1  
Just check if a given number is palindrome. Not search for them in a range of number, example: 1000 to 9000. –  Fábio Antunes Nov 23 '09 at 21:08
    
@Fábio: I've edited the answer a touch to clarify, then. Feel free to roll it back if I've lost your meaning, but I think that edit clarifies the confusion that had iguananet (and me) wondering. –  Jed Smith Nov 23 '09 at 21:11
1  
Guys your amazing, thanks to all your effort i did it. –  Fábio Antunes Nov 23 '09 at 21:30
    
If someone wondering. The C# code loads the numbers from a XML File and checks if each number is palindromic or not. –  Fábio Antunes Nov 23 '09 at 21:52

10 Answers 10

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Accepted answer is another way to check:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/199184/how-do-i-check-if-a-number-is-a-palindrome

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks :D ..to make 15 chars.. –  Fábio Antunes Nov 23 '09 at 21:28
    
I searched for it at SO. But no luck :S –  Fábio Antunes Nov 23 '09 at 21:54
    
I was searching to see if anyone had a bitwise solution and I came across that. :) –  user152759 Nov 23 '09 at 21:58

I check for palindromes by converting the integer to a string, then reversing the string, then comparing equality. This will be the best approach for you since you're just starting out.

Since you're working in C# and this is homework, I'll use very obscure-looking Python that won't help you:

def is_palindrome(i):
    s = str(i)
    return s[::-1] == s

Convert that to C# and you'll have your answer.

share|improve this answer
34  
"Since you're working in C#, I'll use very obscure-looking Python that won't help you:" Made my day. –  Mercurybullet Nov 23 '09 at 20:49
1  
clever - probably a little overkill but simple to understand and program. good solution. –  echo Nov 23 '09 at 20:50
1  
Waiting for a Brainfuck answer - this will be even more obscure :) –  schnaader Nov 23 '09 at 20:50
4  
Overkill? If that's overkill, what's underkill? –  mquander Nov 23 '09 at 20:55
1  
@mquander: People avoid string compares for some reason, when a string reversal (quick pointer walk) and string compare (quick pointer walk) outweigh creating an array and indexing into it n / 2 times. I know string compares are efficient under the hood, and I don't fear using them; squeezing a few ms out of that tight loop at the expense of readability is a moot argument. –  Jed Smith Nov 23 '09 at 20:57

Main idea:

Input number: 12321
Splitting the digits of the number, put them into an array
=> array [1, 2, 3, 2, 1]
Check if array[x] = array[arr_length - x] for all x = 0..arr_length / 2
If check passed => palindrome
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4  
+1 for straightforward answer that doesn't give away the code. –  JMarsch Nov 23 '09 at 21:24

There are many ways. Probably the simplest is to have 2 indexes, i at beginning and j at end of number. You check to see if a[i] == a[j]. If so, increment i and decrement j. You stop when i > j. When looping if you ever reach a point where a[i] != a[j], then it's not a palindrome.

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You can save a round in 50% of cases by checking if i >= j instead of i > j, since if i == j, n[i] == n[j] –  Matthew Scharley Nov 23 '09 at 21:12
    
Good point :). I think it still ends up O(n/2) either way. –  dcp Nov 23 '09 at 21:31

Here's some working code. The first function tests if a number is palidromic by converting it to a string then an IEnumerable and testing if it is equal to its reverse. This is enough to answer your question. The main function simply iterates over the integers testing them one by one.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

class Program
{
    public static bool IsPalindromic(long l)
    {
        IEnumerable<char> forwards = l.ToString().ToCharArray();
        return forwards.SequenceEqual(forwards.Reverse());
    }

    public static void Main()
    {
        long n = 0;
        while (true)
        {
            if (IsPalindromic(n))
                Console.WriteLine("" + n);
            n++;
        }
    }
}

Update: Here is a more direct method of generating palindromes. It doesn't test numbers individually, it just generates palindromes directly. It's not really useful for answering your homework, but perhaps you will find this interesting anyway:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        bool oddLength = true;
        ulong start = 1;
        while (true)
        {
            for (ulong i = start; i < start * 10; ++i)
            {
                string forwards = i.ToString();
                string reverse = new string(forwards.ToCharArray()
                                                    .Reverse()
                                                    .Skip(oddLength ? 1 : 0)
                                                    .ToArray());
                Console.WriteLine(forwards + reverse);
            }
            oddLength = !oddLength;
            if (oddLength)
                start *= 10;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1: Why write his code for him? –  Jed Smith Nov 23 '09 at 21:05
2  
Why not? He said it would be useful, so I provided it. If he prefers to work it out for himself first, nothing is forcing him to look here. –  Mark Byers Nov 23 '09 at 21:19
1  
OK, and this is the very first thing I saw: "It's irrelevant that it's homework: always just answer with complete code." So what's your point? –  Mark Byers Nov 23 '09 at 21:23
1  
Ah, that's just one of the "extreme" positions that he was attempting to reconcile. I still think it's his choice if he wants to look at complete code or not. –  Mark Byers Nov 23 '09 at 21:26
1  
My opinion is that if someone comes on here asking for hints to do homework, I'll give them hints. If they want the answer, I'll give them the answer. It might be a good idea to explain to students why giving hints is better than just giving them the answer, but if they want the answer, why not give it? I find that I more agree with the second post than the first on that page. I don't think this is the place to discuss this though. It's off-topic for the question. –  Mark Byers Nov 23 '09 at 21:35

Here's some pseudocode:

function isPalindrome(number) returns boolean
  index = 0
  while number != 0
    array[index] = number mod 10
    number = number div 10
    index = index + 1

  startIndex = 0;
  endIndex = index - 1

  while startIndex > endIndex
    if array[endIndex] != array[startIndex]
      return false
    endIndex = endIndex - 1
    startIndex = startIndex + 1

  return true

Note that that's for base 10. Change the two 10s in the first while loop for other bases.

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1  
All this work just to avoid a string compare... –  Jed Smith Nov 23 '09 at 20:55
    
You can do this without allocating memory by eliminating the array, if you understand what the string conversion is doing. That's what I was trying to show. –  Moishe Lettvin Nov 23 '09 at 21:27

The following function will work for both numbers as well as for strings.

public bool IsPalindrome(string stringToCheck)
{
   char[] rev = stringToCheck.Reverse().ToArray();
   return (stringToCheck.Equals(new string(rev), StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase));
}

zamirsblog.blogspot.com

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in theory you want to convert the number to a string. then convet the string to an array of characters and loop the array comparing character (i) with character (array length - i) if the two characters are not equal exit the loop and return false. if it makes it all the way through the loop it is a Palindrome.

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Interesting. I'd probably convert the number to a string, and then write a recursive function to decide whether any given string is a palendrome.

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My solution:

bool IsPalindrome(string str)
{
    if(str.Length == 1 || str.Length == 0) return true;
    return str[0] == str[str.Length-1] && IsPalindrome(str.Substring(1,str.Length-2));
}
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