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I often encounter the case where I need to get all the beginning of a string without some last part.

For example, the host part of a FQDN without the domain name:

www.example.org -> www
foo.bar.example.org -> foo.bar
foo.bar.baz.some.domain.name -> foo.bar.baz.some

(The same applies for other examples where you need to strip the end of the input.)

I usually use a mix of cut and rev for this, such as:

echo "foo.bar.example.org" | rev | cut -d "." -f 3- | rev

This does the trick, but I wonder if there is a better way to do this?

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

With awk you could do:

$ awk '{NF=NF-2}1' FS=. OFS=. file
www
foo.bar
foo.bar.baz.some

Generalize to the last N feilds where N=2:

$ awk '{NF=NF-N}1' FS=. OFS=. N=2 file
www
foo.bar
foo.bar.baz.some

With sed you could do:

$ sed 's/[.][^.]*[.][^.]*$//' file
www
foo.bar
foo.bar.baz.some

Generalized:

$ sed -r 's/([.][^.]*){2}$//' file
www
foo.bar
foo.bar.baz.some
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Good one! Also awk -F"." '{OFS=FS}NF=(NF-2)' file works. –  fedorqui Jul 25 '13 at 13:18
1  
@fedorqui I would throw {OFS=FS} into the BEGIN block to avoid that assignment on every line in the input and NR=(NF-2) as the condition for empty block won't print an empty line when NF=2 which may or may not be useful for a given usecase. –  iiSeymour Jul 25 '13 at 13:26
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