Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on this application at the moment that uses XML to transmit data. The characters in the XML file is hard copied to a text file and then transmitted (we're working to compensate for very limited infrastructure). The link below should demonstrate. The text file basically has one long string of characters.

http://pastebin.com/K4Vft9Uh

I'm looking for a way to convert this file back to XML format like so :

http://pastebin.com/i7b9xKf5

Which is basically the regular XML structure.

I need to use SAX with the resultant XML so that i can interface with the rest of the application. Could anyone help with this? I'm guess simply changing the extension type of the file and feeding it to SAX isn't going to help.

This has to be used in an environment with very limited resources (memory, CPU power), eg. on mobile phones, so I cant use DOM.

I'm very new to XML files and parsers. I've looked all over the net to no avail and hence I've posted here. Thank you in advance.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Um, maybe i'm missing something, but both of those files are xml. the second is just "pretty printed". you don't need to "pretty print" xml in order to parse it with a sax (or any other) xml parser.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with you. But this still is a .txt file. Would simply renaming the extension to .xml do? Or does that even matter? –  lost_trekkie Jul 25 '13 at 17:40
    
@AbhilashAlex - extensions have no meaning except for "convenience". it's a cheap way for a person and the OS to "guess" what the file content type is. the content is the only thing that actually matters. if the content is xml, then you can change the extension to whatever you want and it doesn't matter. –  jtahlborn Jul 25 '13 at 20:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.