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I've found a way to do what I want which is, But I'm wondering if there's a way I can get this down to one line.

I have a list of list of lists of strings, as compared to a lists of numbers (for which there's an answer: [Sum of list of lists; returns sum list)

Example List:

list = [['T=-40F A=0K', 'T=-15F A=0K', 'T=59F A=0K', 'T=98F A=0K', 'T=120F A=0K'],
 ['T=-40F A=10K','T=-15F A=10K','T=59F A=10K','T=98F A=10K','T=120F A=10K']]

Example Output:

['T=-40F A=0K', 'T=-15F A=0K', 'T=59F A=0K', 'T=98F A=0K', 'T=120F A=0K', 'T=-40F A=10K', 'T=-15F A=10K', 'T=59F A=10K', 'T=98F A=10K', 'T=120F A=10K']

I can join these with this method:

new = []
for i in [['T=%.0fF A=%.0fK'%(t,a)for t in TEMP] for a in ALT]:
    new = new + i

Anyone got anything?

As for the application im adding a legend to a matplotlib plot

This would be really easy, and an awesome feature with sum(list)

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How does your input correspond to your output? And what are you trying to do with new = [] and new = new + 1? –  Jon Clements Jul 25 '13 at 14:11
    
@ Inbar Rose: Im not sure its a duplicate due because all those answers are multi line. –  CodeMode Jul 25 '13 at 14:19
    
@hivert : I was looking for something more like what provided Rohit Jain... there's no need to import anything –  CodeMode Jul 25 '13 at 14:27
1  
@CodeMode Importing modules is not something you should be avoiding - the modules are there for a reason. They provide better, fast implementations of these things for you. –  Lattyware Jul 25 '13 at 14:28
    
@CodeMode: Rohit Jain's code is the same as comprehension_flatten in stackoverflow.com/questions/406121/…. –  hivert Jul 25 '13 at 14:31
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marked as duplicate by Inbar Rose, Lattyware, Zero Piraeus, Saullo Castro, Graviton Aug 13 '13 at 1:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using List Comprehension:

>>> my_list = [['T=-40F A=0K', 'T=-15F A=0K', 'T=59F A=0K', 'T=98F A=0K', 'T=120F A=0K'], ['T=-40F A=10K','T=-15F A=10K','T=59F A=10K','T=98F A=10K','T=120F A=10K']]
>>>
>>> [y for x in my_list for y in x]
['T=-40F A=0K', 'T=-15F A=0K', 'T=59F A=0K', 'T=98F A=0K', 'T=120F A=0K', 'T=-40F A=10K', 'T=-15F A=10K', 'T=59F A=10K', 'T=98F A=10K', 'T=120F A=10K']

And you should not use list as your variable name.

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2  
Note that a list comp will be slower (and less readable) for this task than itertools.chain.from_iterable(). –  Lattyware Jul 25 '13 at 14:28
    
Aware of that, but my lists are fairly small. I'm more for reducing total program size i'd rather not import anything –  CodeMode Jul 25 '13 at 14:31
    
@CodeMode One line of code is not going to matter in terms of size - it will however make your code more readable and efficient. –  Lattyware Jul 25 '13 at 14:34
    
@CodeMode. Please don't be afraid of importing modules. itertools is one such precious module, which you will not want to miss, such useful and efficient functions it provides. You should learn using libraries. They are there for some reason. –  Rohit Jain Jul 25 '13 at 14:38
    
In either case thank you both! They are both great solutions and really help me with my engineering workload! –  CodeMode Jul 25 '13 at 14:59
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You want to flatten the iterable - itertools.chain.from_iterable() exists for that very purpose:

>>> data = ...
>>> import itertools
>>> list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(data))
['T=-40F A=0K', 'T=-15F A=0K', 'T=59F A=0K', 'T=98F A=0K', 'T=120F A=0K', 'T=-40F A=10K', 'T=-15F A=10K', 'T=59F A=10K', 'T=98F A=10K', 'T=120F A=10K']

It returns an iterator, so you can use list() if you need a list, or just use the iterator.

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You can flatten the list using itertools.chain().

>>> testList =[['T=-40F A=0K', 'T=-15F A=0K', 'T=59F A=0K', 'T=98F A=0K', 'T=120F A=0K'],
 ['T=-40F A=10K','T=-15F A=10K','T=59F A=10K','T=98F A=10K','T=120F A=10K']]
>>> 
>>> from itertools import chain
>>> chain(*testList)
<itertools.chain object at 0x02B1E910>
>>> list(chain(*testList))
['T=-40F A=0K', 'T=-15F A=0K', 'T=59F A=0K', 'T=98F A=0K', 'T=120F A=0K', 'T=-40F A=10K', 'T=-15F A=10K', 'T=59F A=10K', 'T=98F A=10K', 'T=120F A=10K']

OR Use itertools.chain.from_iterable()

>>> list(chain.from_iterable(testList))
['T=-40F A=0K', 'T=-15F A=0K', 'T=59F A=0K', 'T=98F A=0K', 'T=120F A=0K', 'T=-40F A=10K', 'T=-15F A=10K', 'T=59F A=10K', 'T=98F A=10K', 'T=120F A=10K']

P.S - Please don't use list as a variable name, it shadows the builtin.

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Using * to unpack the list is inefficient - from_iterable() is there for that purpose. –  Lattyware Jul 25 '13 at 14:11
    
Thanks! Great response I should read up on list comprehension –  CodeMode Jul 25 '13 at 14:13
    
Didn't know that. Thanks for the comment. Added it to the answer. :) –  Sukrit Kalra Jul 25 '13 at 14:13
1  
@CodeMode There is no list comprehension here. –  Lattyware Jul 25 '13 at 14:14
    
@CodeMode : List comprehension is used in Rohit Jain's answer. –  Sukrit Kalra Jul 25 '13 at 14:14
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Try itertools.chain.fromiterable() -

from itertools import chain
result = list(chain.from_iterable(your_list))
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