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I'm trying to come up with a narrowing cast (a general solution) that gracefully ignores lost data. In Visual Studio, a narrowing cast that loses data triggers a "Run-Time Check Failure #1". I do not want to turn it off, instead I'm trying to implement a narrow_cast that would gracefully do narrowing casts and wouldn't trigger the run time check.

Visual Studio suggests:

char c = (i & 0xFF);

So I started with this, and came up with this ugly solution:

template< typename T >
struct narrow_mask
{
  static const T value = T(0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF);
};

template <typename T, typename U>
T narrow_cast(const U& a)
{
  return static_cast<T>(a & narrow_mask<T>::value );
}

While it works (VS it seems is perfectly fine with losing data on constants), it's neither complete (no support for non integral data), nor correct (I think it would not work correctly for signed values).

Any suggestions for a better solution, or a better narrow_mask implementation?

Edit: In face of comments that this question is VS specific, I checked the standard document, and it seems that the result of a narrowing static_cast is implementation dependant. Hence, the question can be nicer stated as creating a well-defined (ergo, not implementation dependant) narrowing cast. I do not care much about the specifics of the result value, as long as it's well defined and dependant on the type (not return 0).

share|improve this question
    
If nothing else, you could use template specialization for non-integral types, but that does seem kinda hackish. –  Drew McGowen Jul 25 '13 at 14:24
1  
Well, you could do a bit of template meta-programming and use std::numeric_limits to build the mask and preform checks and stuff –  StoryTeller Jul 25 '13 at 14:28
    
I thought about that, but that would still not work for non-integrals. –  Kornel Kisielewicz Jul 25 '13 at 14:31
1  
Does your compiler warn if you make a static_cast? At least gcc does not complain if the narrowing conversion is explicit: int i = f(); short s = i; warns, but short s = static_cast<short>(i); does not warn --you told it that you know what you are doing by means of the cast –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 25 '13 at 14:35
1  
reinterpret_cast requires the types to be the same size. –  Kornel Kisielewicz Jul 27 '13 at 14:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

Use std::numeric_limits and the modulus operator. Get the maximum allowed value of the destination type, cast it to the source type, add one, take the modulus, and cast to the destination type.

The resulting value will certainly be representable in the destination type, i.e. there will be no undefined behavior, but I don't know if MSVC will still throw a warning. I don't have a copy of it to check.

This doesn't preserve negative numbers, though. It can probably be extended to do so, but I'm not sure how. (It's getting late here.)

template< typename to, typename from >
to narrow_cast( from value ) {
    static_assert( std::numeric_limits< to >::max() < std::numeric_limits< from >::max(),
        "narrow_cast used in non-narrowing context" );

    return static_cast< to >( from %
        ( static_cast< from >( std::numeric_limits< to >::max() ) + 1 ) ) );
}
share|improve this answer
    
There are a couple of issues, but yeah, this seems workable... however, this will generate suboptimal code compared to the & solution which gets optimized off? –  Kornel Kisielewicz Jul 27 '13 at 16:27
    
@KornelKisielewicz: There's a good chance the compiler will be able to optimize it. For example, if casting to an unsigned char, max() + 1 should yield 256 (on most systems), and the compiler should know how to optimize % 256 very well. –  Cornstalks Jul 27 '13 at 17:30
    
Yeah, I'm trying to restrict myself to free operations. The modulus should translate to a bitwise AND which in turn should be implemented as access to the low-order part of a register. What's missing is sign extension. Actually the whole wrap-around policy should be explicit, and perhaps should not be allowed for negative numbers. I might expand this later. –  Potatoswatter Jul 28 '13 at 4:48

Here's one version that uses a little bit of C++11. If you don't have access to constexpr, you can just delete it. If you don't have access to std::make_unsigned, it's possible to implement your own. If you don't have std::enable_if, you might be able to use Boost's (or make your own). It works for both signed and unsigned types, as well as positive and negative values. Update: updated to work with floating point types (and floating point to integral, and vice versa).

#include <type_traits>

// From integer type to integer type
template <typename to, typename from>
constexpr typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<from>::value && std::is_integral<to>::value, to>::type
narrow_cast(const from& value)
{
    return static_cast<to>(value & (static_cast<typename std::make_unsigned<from>::type>(-1)));
}

// For these next 3 versions, you'd be best off locally disabling the compiler warning
// There isn't much magic you can do when floating point types get invovled

// From floating point type to floating point type
template <typename to, typename from>
constexpr typename std::enable_if<std::is_floating_point<from>::value && std::is_floating_point<to>::value, to>::type
narrow_cast(const from& value)
{
    // The best you can do here is a direct cast
    return static_cast<to>(value);
}

// From integer type to floating point type
template <typename to, typename from>
constexpr typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<from>::value && std::is_floating_point<to>::value, to>::type
narrow_cast(const from& value)
{
    // The best you can do here is a direct cast
    return static_cast<to>(value);
}

// From floating point type to integer type
template <typename to, typename from>
constexpr typename std::enable_if<std::is_floating_point<from>::value && std::is_integral<to>::value, to>::type
narrow_cast(const from& value)
{
    // The best you can do here is a direct cast
    return static_cast<to>(value);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The && operator works inside the enable_if expression. –  Potatoswatter Jul 28 '13 at 4:51
    
@Potatoswatter: Ha, yes, you're right. I got carried away with the templates... –  Cornstalks Jul 28 '13 at 20:44
    
+1 : I'll award the bounty to Potatoswatter because he's got the highest upvote count, but I'm really grateful for this answer because I'm working in a C++11 setup, and think that this approach has it's benefits. –  Kornel Kisielewicz Jul 31 '13 at 16:05

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