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I would like to catch a specific exception and handle it accordingly - then I would like to continue and perform the generic handling that other exceptions would have to.

Coming from a C background, I could have previously utilised gotos to achieve the desired effect.

This is what I'm currently doing is and it works fine:

try:
    output_var = some_magical_function()
except IntegrityError as zde:
    integrity_error_handling()
    shared_exception_handling_function(zde) # could be error reporting
except SomeOtherException as soe:
    shared_exception_handling_function(soe) # the same function as above

Tldr:

Ie - is there "Pythonic" way of doing the following:

try:
    output_var = some_magical_function()
except IntegrityError as zde:
    integrity_error_handling()
except ALLExceptions as ae: # all exceptions INCLUDING the IntregityError
    shared_exception_handling_function(ae) # could be error reporting

NB: I am aware of the finally clause - this isn't intended for tidy-up (ie- closing files)·

share|improve this question
    
Unfortunately in Python there's no case switch-alike techniques to "fall through" certain exceptions but to construct a cascaded try..except structure to handle specific in inner, then raise to outer for general handling. –  woozyking Jul 25 '13 at 14:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You could reraise the exception, and handle the generic case in the outer handler of a nested setup:

try:
    try:
        output_var = some_magical_function()
    except IntegrityError as zde:
        integrity_error_handling()
        raise
except ALLExceptions as ae: # all exceptions INCLUDING the IntregityError
    shared_exception_handling_function(ae) # could be error reporting

The unqualified raise statement re-raises the current exception, so the IntegrityError exception is thrown again to be handled by the AllExceptions handler.

The other path you could take is to test for the exception type:

try:
    output_var = some_magical_function()
except ALLExceptions as ae: # all exceptions INCLUDING the IntregityError
    if isinstance(ae, IntegrityError):
        integrity_error_handling()
    shared_exception_handling_function(ae) # could be error reporting
share|improve this answer
    
The second approach would be appropriate for certain libraries with a pool of specific errors that inherits the same parent exception. The first is more suitable when generalization is harder to make. Combining both is near-bullet-proof yet still elegant/Pythonic, imho. –  woozyking Jul 25 '13 at 14:41
    
@woozyking: But for ALLExceptions to catch IntegrityError, it has to be a base class for the latter. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 25 '13 at 14:42
    
Indeed. I assume a lot of people would start with creating subclasses to the generic Exception and then work on mid-level abstraction when needed. –  woozyking Jul 25 '13 at 14:44
    
Should we modify our questions & answers to remove any ambiguity (ALLExceptions -> Exceptions)? It'll be one less question for newcomers when they're reading up on the thread... –  IntrepidBrit Jul 25 '13 at 15:12
    
I don't think so; and generally speaking, it is a bad idea to use except Exception: or except: as you'll be catching keyboard interrupts, memory errors and such as well. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 25 '13 at 15:15

The Exception class will match all exceptions...

try:
    output_var = some_magical_function()
except IntegrityError as zde:
    integrity_error_handling()
except Exception as ae:
    shared_exception_handling_function(ae) # could be error reporting

But it sounds like you want the final clause to run for both IntegrityError exceptions as well as everything else. So you'll need a different construct, possibly this:

try:
    try:
        output_var = some_magical_function()
    except IntegrityError as zde:
        integrity_error_handling()
        raise
except Exception as ae:
    shared_exception_handling_function(ae) # could be error reporting

The raise command on the inner try...except block causes the caught exception to be passed up to the outer block.

share|improve this answer
    
Exception matches all built-in exceptions that do not lead to system exit. –  Michael J. Barber Jul 25 '13 at 15:12

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