Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'll try to keep this short and simple. What I'm trying to do is read in a binary file, store the data as a string of hex values, use regex to modify some hex values, and then spit the data out into a new binary file (that is a slightly modified version of the original).

I can do all of those steps except for the last one. When I open the new binary file in the hex editor, it all seems to be wrong... I want it to be exactly how my hex string is, but in the hex editor.

Here is what I'm attempting to do when creating the new file:

#format data string into an array for file processing
@data_ary = unpack('H*', $data_str);

generate_new_file($filname, \@data_ary);


sub generate_new_file
{
     my $fname = "mod -" . shift(@_);
     my $aref = shift(@_);

     open(BIN, ">", $fname) or die;
     binmode(BIN);

     for my $nybble(@$aref)
     {
         print (BIN $nybble)
     }

     close(BIN);
}

I'm guessing my problem has to do with my use of unpack. But I'm not really sure how else to get a huge hex string into a form where it will actually be read as hex and not ascii characters. Any suggestions are greatly appreciated!

EDIT 1: For clarification the code shown above is only for trying to output the data into a new file. I already have all the hex I want to output in $data_str. So the unpack is an attempt to get the string of hex into a list of hex values.

EDIT 2: I'm getting closer. I removed the unpack from the beginning since my data is already a single string of hex. So i just split it and put it into the array. This at least gets the size of the file correct now. However my new problem is that it's cropping off the second part of every byte and replacing it with a 0 (when viewed in the hex editor)... But when I print the elements of the array get the correct data. Any ideas? New code below:

#format data string into an array for file processing
@data_ary = split //, $data_str;    
generate_new_file($filname, \@data_ary);


sub generate_new_file
{
     my $fname = "mod -" . shift(@_);
     my $aref = shift(@_);

     open(BIN, ">", $fname) or die;
     binmode(BIN);

     for (my $i = 0; $i < @$aref; $i += 2)
     {
         my ($hi, $lo) = @$aref[$i, $i+1];
         print BIN pack "H", $hi.$lo;
     }

     close(BIN);
}

EDIT 3: I figured it out! Forgot the "*" when calling pack so it would do more than just the first character! Finished code below. Thanks Amon!

#format data string into an array for file processing
@data_ary = split //, $data_str;    
generate_new_file($filname, \@data_ary);


sub generate_new_file
{
     my $fname = "mod -" . shift(@_);
     my $aref = shift(@_);

     open(BIN, ">", $fname) or die;
     binmode(BIN);

     for (my $i = 0; $i < @$aref; $i += 2)
     {
         my ($hi, $lo) = @$aref[$i, $i+1];
         print BIN pack "H*", $hi.$lo;
     }

     close(BIN);
}
share|improve this question
    
If you unpack, you usually have to pack back to get the same format. –  choroba Jul 25 '13 at 14:36
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here, the unpack returns a single string, not an array of values. If you want to have an array of hex characters (each denoting 4 bits), then you have to split the resulting string:

my @data = split //, unpack "H*", $data;

(use split /..\K/, $data to split into byte-equivalents)

Before printing this data to a filehandle, you also have to pack it to get the original data again. I would recommend to do this at least on 8-bit parts of the original data:

for (my $i = 0; $i < @$aref; $i += 2) {
   my ($hi, $lo) = @$aref[$i, $i+1];
   print OUT pack "H*", $hi.$lo;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just for clarification how is it that it returns a single string? That unpack should not be in scalar context because of the assignment to an array right? I'm really confused now lol. Just tried to implement this and I'm getting a different result but still not correct. The resulting file is somehow twice as large as the orginial when it should be the same size. It's also completely messed up in the hex editor. –  Gaax Jul 25 '13 at 14:57
    
Because the H pattern creates a hex string, only a single value is returned; independent from context. It does not create a list like qw/00 A0 97/ but "00A097". When we split this string into nybbles (qw/0 0 A 0 9 7/) then we have to join it before packing it. This is what my loop is about. If we don't do that, we'd create the equivalent of "\x00\x00\xA0\x00\x90\x70" –  amon Jul 25 '13 at 15:13
    
Ok that makes sense. I'm getting closer. I removed the unpack from the beginning since my data is already a single string of hex. So i just split it and put it into the array. This at least gets the size of the file correct now. However my new problem is that it's cropping off the second part of every byte and replacing it with a 0... Any ideas? –  Gaax Jul 25 '13 at 16:47
    
Well, this is difficult without seeing your code. –  amon Jul 25 '13 at 16:54
    
Sorry about that. I've made an edit to the question with the code I'm now using. It's basically what you suggested but without the first unpack. –  Gaax Jul 25 '13 at 17:15
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.