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In Python, the defaultdict class provides a convenient way to create a mapping from key -> [list of values], in the following example,

from collections import defaultdict
d = defaultdict(list)
d[1].append(2)
d[1].append(3)
# d is now {1: [2, 3]}

Is there an equivalent to this in Java?

Why I chose Tendayi Mawushe's solution

This solution is good because it more faithfully renders the idea of defaultdict. However, you're not quite recovering the Pythonic expressiveness -- defaultdict is actually taking a function, not a class (below). On the other hand, that would probably make the Java code using it more verbose

> python
>>> def f(): return x
>>> x = 3
>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> y = defaultdict(f)
>>> y[2]
3

Sorry for the latency accepting this, and thanks to Luno and dfa for their helpful answers as well.

postscript -- if only Scala compiled faster, I would use it instead...

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5 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

There is nothing that gives the behaviour of default dict out of the box. However creating your own default dict in Java would not be that difficult.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.List;

public class DefaultDict<K, V> extends HashMap<K, V> {

    Class<V> klass;
    public DefaultDict(Class klass) {
        this.klass = klass;    
    }

    @Override
    public V get(Object key) {
        V returnValue = super.get(key);
        if (returnValue == null) {
            try {
                returnValue = klass.newInstance();
            } catch (Exception e) {
                throw new RuntimeException(e);
            }
            this.put((K) key, returnValue);
        }
        return returnValue;
    }    
}

This class could be used like below:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    DefaultDict<Integer, List<Integer>> dict =
        new DefaultDict<Integer, List<Integer>>(ArrayList.class);
    dict.get(1).add(2);
    dict.get(1).add(3);
    System.out.println(dict);
}

This code would print: {1=[2, 3]}

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2  
Instead of using a Class, you can also try passing a Guava Supplier -- see docs.guava-libraries.googlecode.com/git-history/v10.0/javadoc/… –  Lambda Fairy Oct 3 '11 at 1:29
    
Or, if you don't want the Guava dependeny, just define your own Supplier<V> interface in DefaultDict. –  Soulman Nov 27 '12 at 13:41
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in addition to apache collections, check also google collections:

A collection similar to a Map, but which may associate multiple values with a single key. If you call put(K, V) twice, with the same key but different values, the multimap contains mappings from the key to both values.

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You can use multimap from apache-collections

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Using just the Java runtime library you could use a HashMap and add an ArrayList to hold your values when the key does not exist yet or add the value to the list when the key does exist.

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The solution from @tendayi-mawushe did not work for me with Primitive types (e.g. InstantiationException Integer), here is one implementation that works with Integer, Double, Float. I often use Maps with these and added static constructors for conveninence

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

/** Simulate the behaviour of Python's defaultdict */
public class DefaultHashMap<K, V> extends HashMap<K, V> {
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

    private final Class<V> cls;
    private final Number defaultValue;

    @SuppressWarnings({ "rawtypes", "unchecked" })
    public DefaultHashMap(Class factory) {
        this.cls = factory;
        this.defaultValue = null;
    }

    public DefaultHashMap(Number defaultValue) {
        this.cls = null;
        this.defaultValue = defaultValue;
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    @Override
    public V get(Object key) {
        V value = super.get(key);
        if (value == null) {
            if (defaultValue == null) {
                try {
                    value = cls.newInstance();
                } catch (Exception e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            } else {
                value = (V) defaultValue;
            }
            this.put((K) key, value);
        }
        return value;
    }

    public static <T> Map<T, Integer> intDefaultMap() {
        return new DefaultHashMap<T, Integer>(0);
    }

    public static <T> Map<T, Double> doubleDefaultMap() {
        return new DefaultHashMap<T, Double>(0d);
    }

    public static <T> Map<T, Float> floatDefaultMap() {
        return new DefaultHashMap<T, Float>(0f);
    }

    public static <T> Map<T, String> stringDefaultMap() {
        return new DefaultHashMap<T, String>(String.class);
    }
}

And a test, for good manners:

import static org.junit.Assert.assertEquals;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;

import org.junit.Test;

public class DefaultHashMapTest {

    @Test
    public void test() {
        Map<String, List<String>> dm = new DefaultHashMap<String, List<String>>(
                ArrayList.class);
        dm.get("nokey").add("one");
        dm.get("nokey").add("two");
        assertEquals(2, dm.get("nokey").size());
        assertEquals(0, dm.get("nokey2").size());
    }

    @Test
    public void testInt() {
        Map<String, Integer> dm = DefaultHashMap.intDefaultMap();
        assertEquals(new Integer(0), dm.get("nokey"));
        assertEquals(new Integer(0), dm.get("nokey2"));
        dm.put("nokey", 3);
        assertEquals(new Integer(0), dm.get("nokey2"));
        dm.put("nokey3", 3);
        assertEquals(new Integer(3), dm.get("nokey3"));
    }

    @Test
    public void testString() {
        Map<String, String> dm = DefaultHashMap.stringDefaultMap();
        assertEquals("", dm.get("nokey"));
        dm.put("nokey1", "mykey");
        assertEquals("mykey", dm.get("nokey1"));
    }
}
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