Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am a real C++ noob, so please be patient with me. First lets set the stage.

I have a C++ source in binary.cpp that compiles to a binary which looks like:

# include "lotsofheaders.h"

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int errorcode = FOOBAR_GLOBAL_UNKNOWN;

    // foobar instanciation
    Foobar foobar();

    // multiple calls to :send_auth passing in foobar instance
    errorcode = send_auth(getX(), getY(), foobar);
    errorcode = send_auth(getX(), getY(), foobar);
    errorcode = send_auth(getX(), getY(), foobar);

    return errorcode == FOOBAR_OK ? EXIT_SUCCESS : EXIT_FAILURE;
}

The send_auth method is loaded from another object code file and it gets passed an instance of foobar. The reason is, Foobar comes from an API object that I do not have the source of and which MUST NOT be instantiated more than once.

Since main is called only once, everything works as expected: There is only one instance of Foobar and send_auth can be called multiple times.

The binary is not of any use for me, I need a shared object library that does the same. It creates only one instance of Foobar and exposes an external interface method send_with_auth that can be called multiple times after my shared object lib was loaded.

My library code in library.cpp looks some like this:

# include "lotsofheaders.h"
# include "library.h"

const char* send_with_auth(const char* X, const char* Y){
  std::string x(X);
  std::string y(Y);

  int result = send_auth(x, y, 'some Foobar singleton');

  return true;
}

Since I load my shared object library via Ruby FFI I need some C-Style headers in library.h for my lib:

extern "C" {
  const char* send_with_auth(const char* X, const char* Y);
}

Now with stage set I have to create an instance of Foobar exactly once inside my library and pass it into every call of send_auth to not get a memory violation error from Foobar.

Here's my (overly complex) attempt with a singleton as I understood it. There is a new library.h like so:

extern "C" {
  class Singleton
  {
    private:
      static bool instanceFlag;
      static Singleton *single;
      Singleton()
      {
        //private constructor
      }
    public:
      static Foobar* fo;
      static Singleton* getInstance();
      ~Singleton()
      {
        instanceFlag = false;
      }
    };
  const char* send_with_auth(const char* X, const char* Y);
}

And there is this implementation library.cpp:

# include "lotsofheaders.h"
# include "library.h"

bool Singleton::instanceFlag = false;
Singleton* Singleton::single = NULL;
Singleton* Singleton::getInstance()
{
  if(! instanceFlag)
  {
    single = new Singleton();
    instanceFlag = true;
    // bringing up my Foobar instance once and only once
    Foobar fo;
    single->fo = &fo;
    return single;
  }
  else
  {
    return single;
  }
}

const char* send_with_auth(const char* X, const char* Y){
  std::string x(X);
  std::string y(Y);

  Singleton *single;
  single = Singleton::getInstance();

  int result = send_auth(x, y, *single->fo);

  return true;
}

This code at least compiles and I can bind together everything to a shared object library. Now when I load that library in an external process (a Ruby module using Ruby FFI in my case) I always get the error:

Could not open library '/some/path/libfoobar.so': /some/path/libfoobar.so: undefined symbol: _ZN9Singleton2erE (LoadError)

I'm quite sure that my compiling/binding/stripping process from library.o to libfoobar.so is ok, because it succeeds in other cases. I am quite sure that I misunderstand C++'s singleton concept here. I wonder how I can achive my goal: create only one instance of Foobar inside my shared object library and pass it into every call of the only methods my library exposes to the outside.

Can anyone help on that? Regards Felix

Update

Using the CommandlineParser in the library was stupid. In fact it simply returned two C-strings. The API library path and a log dir. With that I recreated a namespace:

namespace
{
  char* home("/path/to/api/libs");
  char* log("/tmp");
  Foobar foobar(home, log);
}

That leads to a seg fault in the moment when I load the library. In contrast to that I can put these lines into my function directly:

const char* send_with_auth(const char* X, const char* Y){
  std::string x(X);
  std::string y(Y);

  char* home("/path/to/api/libs");
  char* log("/tmp");
  Foobar foobar(home, log); 

  int result = send_auth(x, y, &foobar);

  return true;
}

Everything works fine here except the fact that a second call to send_with_authlets crash everything cause Foobar is instantiated again.

Update 2:

Finally I solved it even simpler, used a globally available bool switch to initialize my Foobar instance only once:

namespace baz{
  bool foobarInitialized = false;
}

const char* send_with_auth(const char* certificatePath, const char* certificatePin, const char* xmlData){
  std::string certificate_path(certificatePath);
  std::string certificate_pin(certificatePin);
  std::string xml_data(xmlData);

  Foobar *foobar_ptr;

  if (! baz::foobarInitialized) {
    char* home_dir("/path/to/api/lib");
    char* log_dir("/tmp");
    foobar_ptr = new Foobar(home_dir, log_dir);
    baz::foobarInitialized = true;
  }

  int result = send_auth(x, y, foobar_ptr);

  return xml_data.c_str();
}

Now I can call send_with_auth endlessly without having Foobar instantiated more than once. Done!

share|improve this question
    
Sorry, don't have time to read it all, but you have a most vexing parse issue. Foobar foobar(); declares a function. You want just Foobar foobar; to create a default-constructed object. – Angew Jul 25 '13 at 15:42
    
My bad, fixed up here, but does not cause the error. – GeorgieF Jul 25 '13 at 15:45
    
You store a pointer to the object foobar that is local to getInstance into Singleton::fo. Despite not being the cause of your link error, the undefined behavior is there waiting for you to successfully link. – Casey Jul 25 '13 at 15:59
    
OK, so in your update, where is the segfault? What does the stack trace show? – Useless Jul 26 '13 at 7:58
up vote 2 down vote accepted

So my first suggestion is to do

The simplest thing that could possibly work

and get rid of the singleton entirely. Just create a global Foobar object in your library:

// library.cpp
namespace {
    Foobar global_foobar;
}

I've put it in an anonymous namespace so it won't clash with any other symbol called "global_foobar" in the main executable, or another library.

This does mean it can only be accessed from within library.cpp. If you have more than one .cpp file linked into your lib, you'll need something marginally more elaborate:

// library_internal.h
namespace my_unique_library_namespace {
    extern Foobar global_foobar;
}

// library.cpp
#include "library_internal.h"
namespace my_unique_library_namespace {
    Foobar global_foobar;
}

// library_2.cpp
#include "library_internal.h"
using my_unique_library_namespace::global_foobar;
share|improve this answer
    
Thx Useless, will give it a try and come back asap. – GeorgieF Jul 25 '13 at 15:47
    
During Foobar instantation I need to pass additional parameters, so my namespace looks something like namespace { System::CommandLineParser argParser; Foobar foobar(argParser.getHomeDir(), argParser.getLogDir());}. This compiles, but brings a segmentation fault when I load it. Even if I comment out the send_auth call. – GeorgieF Jul 25 '13 at 16:09
    
Your question shows the Foobar being default constructed - so that's not right? OK, if you need to pass arguments, you have to defer construction until you have those arguments. How will your library get access to the command-line? – Useless Jul 25 '13 at 16:13
    
Using the CMDLineParser was stupid, but fixing that did not solve my problem. Please see my update up in my initial question. I am going out of ideas at that point. – GeorgieF Jul 26 '13 at 6:58
    
Useless: Finally I made it. See Update 2. Accepted and upvoted your answer anyway, cause it led me to the solution in the end. Thank you for sharing your time with me and helping me out. – GeorgieF Jul 26 '13 at 9:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.