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I've got a large file in the next format:

test.txt
bandera1
abc
def
ghi
jkl
bandera2
bandera1
abc
def
ghi
jkl
bandera2
...

I want to split the file into several files like:

file1.txt

bandera1
abc
def
ghi
jkl
bandera2
...

file2.txt

bandera1
abc
def
ghi
jkl
bandera2
...

I tried with awk to find the pattern:

awk'{/patter1/,/patter2/} {print}' $test.txt >> file$a

But I can't make it stop on after a specific number of matches. I also try sed to find the pattern unfortunately with the same result.

Can someone help me with this problem?

share|improve this question
    
file2.txt must start where file1.txt end –  user2619593 Jul 25 '13 at 16:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try:

awk 'BEGIN { n = 1 } { print $0 > "bandera" n } /bandera2/ { n++ }' infile

For input file:

bandera1
abc
def
ghi
jkl
bandera2
bandera1
abc
def
ghi
jkl
bandera2
bander1
...
bandera2

It yields:

==> bandera1 <==
bandera1
abc
def
ghi
jkl
bandera2

==> bandera2 <==
bandera1
abc
def
ghi
jkl
bandera2

==> bandera3 <==
bander1
...
bandera2

UPDATED (see comments):

awk '
    BEGIN { n = m = 1 } 
    { print $0 > "bandera" n } 
    /bandera2/ { 
        if ( m == 500 ) { n++; m = 0 }
        m++ 
    }
' infile
share|improve this answer
    
thnks that work just fine, one question the increase of n can be conditional like if n -eq 500 then n++, since i need to put in one file several match pattern im trying insted of n++ something like this: { if [ $n -eq 500 ];then n++} so bandera1 can record like 500 pattern match –  user2619593 Jul 25 '13 at 17:26
    
@user2619593: I've updated the answer. I use an additional variable until 500 that flags when to increment the other that is used in output file names. –  Birei Jul 25 '13 at 17:55
    
thank you that work great. Cheers. –  user2619593 Jul 25 '13 at 18:00

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