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how can I read the last two lines from a big log file without load it into memory completely?

I need read it every 10 secs(On a Win machine)...and I'm stuck trying to read the last lines..

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"
    "os"
)

const MYFILE = "logfile.log"

func main() {
    c := time.Tick(10 * time.Second)
    for now := range c {
        readFile(MYFILE)
    }
}

func readFile(fname string){
    file, err:=os.Open(fname)
    if err!=nil{
        panic(err)
    }
    buf:=make([]byte, 32)
    c, err:=file.ReadAt(32, ????)
    fmt.Printf("%s\n", c)


}

The log file is something like:

07/25/2013 11:55:42.400, 0.559
07/25/2013 11:55:52.200, 0.477
07/25/2013 11:56:02.000, 0.463
07/25/2013 11:56:11.800, 0.454
07/25/2013 11:56:21.600, 0.424
07/25/2013 11:56:31.400, 0.382
07/25/2013 11:56:41.200, 0.353
07/25/2013 11:56:51.000, 0.384
07/25/2013 11:57:00.800, 0.393
07/25/2013 11:57:10.600, 0.456

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use file.Seek() or file.ReadAt() to almost the end and then Reading forward. You can only estimate where to start seeking unless you can know that 2 lines = x bytes.

You can get the File length by using the os.Stat(name)

Here is an example based on ReadAt, Stat, and your sample log file:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "os"
    "time"
)

const MYFILE = "logfile.log"

func main() {
    c := time.Tick(10 * time.Second)
    for _ = range c {
        readFile(MYFILE)
    }
}

func readFile(fname string) {
    file, err := os.Open(fname)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    defer file.Close()

    buf := make([]byte, 62)
    stat, err := os.Stat(fname)
    start := stat.Size() - 62
    _, err = file.ReadAt(buf, start)
    if err == nil {
        fmt.Printf("%s\n", buf)
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Joshua it was the better approach to me –  Goku Jul 25 '13 at 19:18
    
I would file.Seek(62, 2) from the end instead and then just file.Read from current position. file.Seek, I suspect, is much cheaper then os.Stat. –  alex Jul 25 '13 at 23:43

I think a combination of File.Seek(0, 2) and File.Read() should work.

The Seek call gets you to the end of file. You can Seek to a position a bit before the EOF to get last few lines. Then you Read till the EOF and just sleep in your goroutine for 10 seconds; next Read has a chance to get you more data.

You can snatch the idea (and the scan-back logic for initially showing few last lines) from GNU tail's source.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice! The plan9 sources are slightly shorter: swtch.com/usr/local/plan9/src/cmd/tail.c –  nes1983 Jul 25 '13 at 20:14

Well, this is only a raw idea and maybe not the best way, you should check and improve it, but seems to work...

I hope that experienced Go users could contribute too..

With Stat you can get the size of the file and from it get the offset for use with ReadAt

func readLastLine(fname string) {
    file, err := os.Open(fname)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    defer file.Close()

    fi, err := file.Stat()
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
    }

    buf := make([]byte, 32)
    n, err := file.ReadAt(buf, fi.Size()-int64(len(buf)))
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
    }
    buf = buf[:n]
    fmt.Printf("%s", buf)

}
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