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I am stuck at correctly disposing Threads, created with RX, on application exiting. I see in Process Explorer that after application closed, threads are still running, causing an IO exceptions.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        CompositeDisposable subsriptions = new CompositeDisposable();

       subscriptions.Add(Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(15))
                .Subscribe(_ =>
                {
                    getData();

                }));
        Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(20));     
            subscriptions.Dispose();
         }   
    }
}

If you see if I uncomment the subscription.Dispose(), the thread terminates without getting any data. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks

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What is getData doing? –  JerKimball Jul 25 '13 at 19:37
    
It just reads from .txt some values. –  Jim Jul 25 '13 at 20:01
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3 Answers

You need some sort of delay between subsriptions.Add(...) and subscriptions.Dispose(). Without a delay between there, your app is simply subscribing and disposing them immediately, with no time for the threads to do their work. (And the Thread.Sleep(1000) doesn't work, since it is inside the subscription function, not part of the main function.)

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I see, I've moved the Thread.Sleep(20000) and increased the mlsec before disposing the subscriptions, but with no luck. –  Jim Jul 25 '13 at 17:27
1  
Usage of Thread.Sleep() is evil. See my answer. You can do without it if you use IObservable via ReactiveExtensions and async / await correctly together. –  bradgonesurfing Jul 26 '13 at 6:24
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The pattern you are looking for is similar to this

class Program {

   public string GetData(){
       return "Hello";
   }

   public string async GetDataAsync(){

       return await Observable
            .Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(15))
            .Take(1)
            .Select(()=>GetData());


   }

   static void Main(string[]args){

       var s = GetDataAsync().Wait();
   }

}

The reason for Wait is that an entry point, Main, in this case cannot be marked as async. Wait blocks the current thread until the Task returned by GetDataAsync produces a value.

Note also that IObservable is compatible with async/await and will return the last value produced by the sequence. That is why I add Take(1) as it will produce only 1 tick.

Another alternative is just to call Wait directly on the IObservable as in

class Program {

   public string GetData(){
       return "Hello";
   }

   public IObservable<string> GetDataObservable(){

       return Observable
            .Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(15))
            .Take(1)
            .Select(()=>GetData());


   }

   static void Main(string[]args){

       var s = GetDataObservable().Wait();
   }

}

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Thanks for so extensive responce, Can I ask you how to deal with disposing the Thread before or after application is closed? Currently I just kill the processes on application shutdown, but I am afraid that while it is working this is not correct way of doing it? –  Jim Jul 26 '13 at 12:25
2  
You don't need to kill any threads. The thread is returned automatically to the thread pool and the process will exit. –  bradgonesurfing Jul 26 '13 at 15:36
    
You very rarely need to directly touch threads I'd you use the reactive extensions and or async / await framework. I recommend doing some research. Once you get it, it's very cool stuff. –  bradgonesurfing Jul 26 '13 at 15:38
    
I agree, that in normal situation this should be normal behavior, but in my case I need terminate all threads on application exit. Because the app shutdown could be caused by by user interaction with the app. So, when the user breaks the normal workflow of the app by closing it, threads are still running in background. causing the IO exceptions. Hope I am clear on what I am trying to say. –  Jim Jul 27 '13 at 4:53
    
Just dispose the subscriptions before application exit. Again you don't need to think about threads. –  bradgonesurfing Jul 27 '13 at 9:16
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You can subscribe your observable with the CancellationToken that will cancel the underlying task execution:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
    Observable.
        Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(15)).
        Subscribe(_ => getData(), cts.Token));
    cts.CancelAfter(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(20));
}
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