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I've got the following code:

package vb4.email;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Value;

public enum ValidAddresses {

    // TODO: Is there a cleaner way to switch debugs?
    // How do we make this bean-able?

    @Value("${email.addresses.defaults.support}")
    DEFAULT_SUPPORT_ADDRESS("support@example.com"),
    @Value("${email.addresses.defaults.performance}")
    DEFAULT_PERFORMANCE_SUPPORT_ADDRESS("speed@example.com");

    private final String email;

    private ValidAddresses(final String email){
        this.email = email;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString()
    {
        return this.email;
    }
}

As you can see from my @Value annotations, I'm looking to "beanify" this process. I want the benefits of the enumerable as a construct, but I'd like to make this configurable in our .properties file. Please keep in mind that the .properties file which has all the key=value pairs is used extensively throughout the site.

Please keep your answers on mark; I'm not looking to debate the validity of what is already in place. (Trust me I understand your frustration).

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3  
Enums are compile time constructs, not runtime. You cannot use @Value with them. The @Targets are @Target({ElementType.FIELD, ElementType.METHOD, ElementType.PARAMETER, ElementType.ANNOTATION_TYPE}) –  Sotirios Delimanolis Jul 25 '13 at 17:49
    
Dang. Is there any solution to what I'm attempting to do? Can't set static variables (easily) via the bean process either... –  Volte Jul 25 '13 at 18:25
    
You could have a @Component that has a bunch of String instance variables annotated with @Value. You won't be able to use enum with this alternative. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Jul 25 '13 at 18:26
    
Thanks Sotirios, do you have a recommended starting point? I've searched around for the past 10 minutes and can't seem to find a comprehensive guide. –  Volte Jul 25 '13 at 18:35

1 Answer 1

You can provide setters for your ValidAddresses enum and then use an initializer, smth like

@Configurable
public class EnumValueInitializer {

  @Value("${email.addresses.defaults.support}")
  private String support;

  @PostConstruct
  public void postConstruct() {
    initializeAddressesEnum();
  }

  private void initializeAddressesEnum() {
    ValidAddresses.DEFAULT_SUPPORT_ADDRESS.setEmail(support);
  }

}

I hope it will be helpful. Good luck.

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Probably you mean @Configuration or @Component, but apart from that this is a great idea! –  membersound Mar 31 '14 at 9:07

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