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I have some survey data that I want to describe by political party and state.

I'm having some trouble with the by() aggregation command. It works with lots of functions, but just not length(). Eg:

by(x, list(party=nn$info$party,state=nn$info$st),mean)

works fine but not

by(x, list(party=nn$info$party,state=nn$info$st),length)

Which returns an array filled not with the count of the data I'm looking for, but just a series of 1's. This is what it looks like for Alabama:

party: D
state: AL
[1] 1
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
party: I
state: AL
[1] 1
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
party: R
state: AL
[1] 1
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Very mystifying. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
what is x here? –  Jonathan Chang Nov 23 '09 at 23:46
1  
If you could write what str(x) said... –  Marek Nov 24 '09 at 7:27
    
x is a vector of length n. nn$info$party and nn$info$st are both vectors (eg info is the data frame). –  bshor Nov 24 '09 at 19:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you are trying to get the number of records for different groups of your data, then the easiest way to do it is usually with table. It isn't clear from your post which data frame you want to use – is it x or nn$info? with this in mind, your code should look something like

with(nn$info, table(party, state=st))

Here's an example anyone can replicate, using the Cars93 dataset in the MASS package.

> with(Cars93, table(Type, AirBags))
         AirBags
Type      Driver & Passenger Driver only None
  Compact                  2           9    5
  Large                    4           7    0
  Midsize                  7          11    4
  Small                    0           5   16
  Sporty                   3           8    3
  Van                      0           3    6
share|improve this answer
    
x is a vector (of length n), nn$info is a dataframe (with n rows). But this did the trick without any reference to x. Perfect! –  bshor Nov 24 '09 at 19:41

Ok, I'm going to guess that x is a data frame. In which case length returns the number of columns, not the number of elements. You want nrow instead. Note that if foo is a data frame, getting a single column by foo$bar will return a data frame with one column.

> by(1:10, rep(1:5, 2), length)
rep(1:5, 2): 1
[1] 2
------------------------------------------------------------ 
rep(1:5, 2): 2
[1] 2
------------------------------------------------------------ 
rep(1:5, 2): 3
[1] 2
------------------------------------------------------------ 
rep(1:5, 2): 4
[1] 2
------------------------------------------------------------ 
rep(1:5, 2): 5
[1] 2
> by(data.frame(1:10), rep(1:5, 2), length)
rep(1:5, 2): 1
[1] 1
------------------------------------------------------------ 
rep(1:5, 2): 2
[1] 1
------------------------------------------------------------ 
rep(1:5, 2): 3
[1] 1
------------------------------------------------------------ 
rep(1:5, 2): 4
[1] 1
------------------------------------------------------------ 
rep(1:5, 2): 5
[1] 1
> by(data.frame(1:10), rep(1:5, 2), nrow)
rep(1:5, 2): 1
[1] 2
------------------------------------------------------------ 
rep(1:5, 2): 2
[1] 2
------------------------------------------------------------ 
rep(1:5, 2): 3
[1] 2
------------------------------------------------------------ 
rep(1:5, 2): 4
[1] 2
------------------------------------------------------------ 
rep(1:5, 2): 5
[1] 2
share|improve this answer
    
x is actually a vector of length n, nn$info a dataframe with n rows. What I was trying to do is summarize x by various factors in nn$info, eg, what is the average x of Republicans in Texas? –  bshor Nov 24 '09 at 19:42

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