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I have a function which returns values when polled, but then at some point will stop returning sensible values as shown below.

Is there a more idiomatic way to poll it than checking if !ok every time. I'm thinking something akin to polling a channel with range.

package main

import "fmt"

func iter() func() (int, bool) {
    i := 0
        return func() (int, bool) {
        if i < 10 {
            i++
            return i, true
        }
        return i, false
    }
}

func main() {
    f := iter()
    for {
        v, ok := f()
        if !ok {
            break
        }
        fmt.Println(v)
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
The code that consumes iter() is straightforward and easy to understand. Why do you think it's not idiomatic? – Paul Hankin Jul 28 '13 at 10:55

I don't think there's a way to avoid checking ok, but you can restructure it to avoid the ugly break:

for v,ok := f(); ok; v,ok = f() {
    fmt.Println(v)
}

It should be noted that this only works in cases where either:

  1. You have a single function with multiple return values to check, OR

  2. You have one or more functions with only one return value to check

Unfortunately Go won't let you do things like

f := iter()
g := iter()
v,ok,v2,ok2 := f(), g(); ok && ok2; v,ok,v2,ok2 := f(), g() {
   // code
}

So if you have a case with multiple functions you're stuck with ifs and breaks unless they only return a single value.

That said, (and on reflection), the more idiomatic way to write an iterator in Go is ranging over a channel. Consider the equivalent program:

func Iterator(iterCh chan<- int) {
    for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
       iterCh <- i
    }
    close(iterCh)
}

func main() {
    iter := make(chan int)
    go Iterator(iter)
    for v := range iter {
       fmt.Println(v)
    }
}

In this case, instead of returning a boolean value, just close the channel whenever you're done sending values. The downside of this method is that if you want to return multiple values, you have to make a struct of some sort to send over the channel.

And finally, if you want to wrap it a bit to hide the channel boilerplate every time you run your iterator:

func Iter() <-chan int {
   iterChan := make(chan int)
   go iter(iterChan)
   return iterChan
}
func iter(iterCh chan<- int) {
    for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
       iterCh <- i
    }
    close(iterCh)
}

func main() {
    for v := range Iter() {
       fmt.Println(v)
    }
}

Which is more code for the initial implementation, but removes having to manually declare a channel every time you want to use an iterator.

share|improve this answer
    
I did think of this, but I hate the repeated v,ok = f()! I agree it's probably neater though. – Ferguzz Jul 25 '13 at 19:51
    
This repetition occurs in the go library, too, so I guess it's ok. – nes1983 Jul 25 '13 at 19:59
    
The repeated v,ok=f() is a bit ugly, but it works. I amended my answer because reading a different question made the real idiomatic way come to me -- using an unbuffered channel. An unbuffered channel can also scale to multiple iterators if you're willing to abuse select and break a bit. – Jsor Jul 25 '13 at 20:16
    
I think using channels is way over the top here. – Ferguzz Jul 26 '13 at 8:08

I don't see how your example is much different from the common idiom for reading until the end of file. For example,

package main

import (
    "bytes"
    "fmt"
    "io"
    "strings"
)

func main() {
    buf := bytes.NewBufferString("line1\nline2")
    for {
        line, err := buf.ReadString('\n')
        if err != nil {
            if err != io.EOF {
                fmt.Println(err)
                return
            }
            if len(line) == 0 {
                break
            }
        }
        line = strings.TrimSuffix(line, "\n")
        fmt.Println(line)
    }
}

Output:

line1
line2

Your example looks idiomatic to me.

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