Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I thank you for your time.

Can you please share with me your experience regarding the count of elements?

first approach - Store elements in one database field as an array and count using serve-side language after one read.

first approach

second approach - Spreading the array in fields and counting the number of fields using SQL COUNT (2 tables).

enter image description here enter image description here

third approach - Storing a field in database which contains an unpdated value of the sum of elements to count.

enter image description here

Which of the approches will be executed faster, and easily scalable.

share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by Dagon, Daniel Vérité, Eric Brown, zhangyangyu, mgibsonbr Jul 26 '13 at 1:48

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
SQL COUNT - with proper normalized tables. But you did nto give an example or scenario –  zod Jul 25 '13 at 20:50
    
only one way to find out for suer, test it –  Dagon Jul 25 '13 at 20:51
    
@Dagon, I deeply agree with you. What do you suggest me to test this. Create a big table and run queries? use a tool without having big table? what tools for SQL queries and what tools for PHP time execution? Dont blame my small knowledge I am new in the web world. thank you –  whiteletters and blankspaces Jul 25 '13 at 20:56
    
@zod. Thank you, I will provide with a detailed scenario as an edit –  whiteletters and blankspaces Jul 25 '13 at 20:57
    
@Zod, I provided with a edit as you adviced me, thank you for your time. –  whiteletters and blankspaces Jul 25 '13 at 21:38
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Store elements in one database field as an array and count using serve-side language after one read.

This one is pretty much bad bad bad. Not only is it bad from a design perspective, but every time you want to count, you have to effectively return all elements. The database spends longer reading actual file pages, as well as longer sending the data back to the client. Once it's on client, you then need to parse it, and then get the count. All taken, this can be FAR slower and is a much worse design.

Spreading the array in fields and counting the number of fields using SQL COUNT.

The best option of the three, if modified. You don't want to spread the array as fields. You really want to spread it out as rows. You want a 1 to many relationship table. This allows the database to do what it's good at, only accessing the minimum amount of required information, and only returning a single number at the end. Much less work involved for everyone here.

Storing a field in database which contains an unpdated value of the sum of elements to count.

This can mean two different things. The first is that you have a field that you manually update every time you insert/delete. This would be bad, because it's easy to forget, so why do it? While this could be the most performant of all of the options, it also increases risk. The second, would be to have a calculated column store the count for you. This allows sql server to keep track of it for you, and can be a reasonable option for making queries easier, but can negatively impact performance when you otherwise don't want a count if you grab the entire row. Overall, the second of these isn't bad, but is pretty situational for when it's actually good.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 and I am thanking you for the detailed answer and the edits. really appreciated. I am reading and understanding –  whiteletters and blankspaces Jul 25 '13 at 20:59
    
Please to note that in the first approach I will only perform one read. of course it can be a long array. Is it still a bad approach to avoid? –  whiteletters and blankspaces Jul 25 '13 at 21:11
1  
I would still say yes, because it is significantly less flexible, and while it's one read, that full read must be done every time. It could also still span several disk pages, and could be the equivalent of more than 1 read. There is no ability for the database to apply various optimizations such as using indexes or only pulling back specific elements that it's asking for if you didn't want to evaluate every one of them. –  Sethcran Jul 25 '13 at 21:12
    
I will lie if I say I totally understand you, but surely it is requiring more knowledge in my side. I thank you. –  whiteletters and blankspaces Jul 25 '13 at 21:20
2  
Yea, after the edit I believe my comments still stand, and that the second option is still the best shot, especially with that table design you have included for it. –  Sethcran Jul 25 '13 at 21:41
show 1 more comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.