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I am new to cluster programming. I have a cluster of 6 computers, and what I want to implement is to run a code comprising multiple threads, such that these threads run on different machines, and then return the output to the master machine.

How can I implement such a task? I tried using pvm and mpich2, but could not find such provisions. Please help.

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2 Answers 2

Take a look at hpx. It is at https://github.com/STEllAR-GROUP/hpx

Here is a link to pdf of a presentation about hpx at c++now

https://github.com/boostcon/cppnow_presentations_2013/blob/master/tue/managing_asynchrony_in_cpp.pdf?raw=true

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thanks for this, but could not recognize how to run a part of program on remote machine, i could not find one such example. please help. –  user123456 Jul 26 '13 at 13:29
    
One such example would be here: github.com/STEllAR-GROUP/hpx/blob/master/examples/quickstart/… –  Thomas Heller Apr 17 at 6:46

When you say you want multiple threads on multiple machines, do you specifically mean threads on those machines as opposed to processes? If so why? MPI in general (whether it's Open MPI, MPICH, or some other implementation) does exactly that and can even be combined with Open MP to provide threading on those machines. A quick Google search will probably provide a thousand tutorials on how to set that up.

The way these libraries work will require some changes to the code on your part however. They aren't magic. You need to explicitly pass around the important data using messages. There are lots of useful functions to make this as efficient as possible.

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well, i couldn't figure out how mpi could be used for a single program, i-e i have a single program, say to generate prime numbers using parallel processing and brute force, checking each number. What i want to do is to check for different ranges on different computers, and retrieve the result. –  user123456 Jul 26 '13 at 13:24
    
That's exactly what MPI is for. It's designed for SPMD programs. You can find lots of tutorials about MPI, but here's a good one (albeit a bit dated, but still applicable) mcs.anl.gov/research/projects/mpi/tutorial/gropp/talk.html. –  Wesley Bland Jul 26 '13 at 13:26
    
thanks for this tutorial, still a doubt. I installed mpi on both master and slave machines, and when running examples, it would execute on the slave machine only if the same executable is present on both the machines, is that so? –  user123456 Jul 26 '13 at 13:34
    
Yes. The executable has to be available on both machines. Usually, this is accomplished on a cluster using NFS, but I think some implementations have an option preload the application binary for you. A quick scan of the help says that Open MPI has a flag for mpiexec called --preload-files that would take care of it. In general, you should have your binary and anything else you need available on all nodes though. –  Wesley Bland Jul 26 '13 at 13:46

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