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My webpage's signup view (below) creates a new user through Django's auth model, User, then uses that newly created user's ID to add more info through my own model, account.Users. My problem is that, though I am passing the new user's ID to the second model (the ForeignKey column in account.Users), I keep getting an error that column *user_id* violates a not-null constraint:

IntegrityError at /account/signup/ 
null value in column "user_id" violates not-null constraint

Here are the relevant parts of my model:

class Users(models.Model):
  user = models.ForeignKey(User, unique=True, null=True, blank=True)
  firstname = models.CharField(max_length=100, blank=True, default='')

And the relevant parts of my view:

def signup(request):
  if request.method == 'POST' and request.POST['firstname']:   
    user = User.objects.create_user(request.POST['username'], request.POST['email'], request.POST['password'])
    userId = user.id
    form = UsersForm(request.POST, request.FILES)
    if form.is_valid():
      cmodel = form.save()
      cmodel.user_id = userId
      cmodel.firstname = request.POST['firstname']
      cmodel.save()

What could be the reason for this error?

Aside from setting *cmodel.user_id* equal to userId, I have also tried setting it equal to the user object created in the first step, as well as a string and int ('1' and 1, respectively). I get the same error each time. I have also tried changing the field to cmodel.user. I can also tell from Django's error page that the variable userId does in fact contain a value.

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Another potentailly relevant piece of info: I've also restarted apache and postgres. –  jball037 Jul 25 '13 at 21:09
    
Did you double checked the table's schema in Postrgres, maybe you created it first without null=True and later fixed it but never actually updated the schema. –  Paulo Bu Jul 25 '13 at 21:12
    
It has always had null=True –  jball037 Jul 25 '13 at 21:14
    
This format used to work, until I changed a some other parts of the code, one of which was installing PIL (Python Image Library) and adding an image field, could this have something to do with it? (I don't see how it could).... –  jball037 Jul 25 '13 at 21:17
    
Not likely, still, be 100% positive that the schema in the database allows null. Not rely only on the model. –  Paulo Bu Jul 25 '13 at 21:18

1 Answer 1

The solution was simple, albeit unexpected. I'm writing it up here in case anyone else runs into the same issue:

In addition to the summarized portion of the model I showed above, I was also trying to save an image with PIL (Python Imaging Library). Adding that to the relevant portion of the model shown above:

class Users(models.Model):
  user = models.ForeignKey(User, unique=True, null=True, blank=True)
  firstname = models.CharField(max_length=100, blank=True, default='')
  profile_pic = models.ImageField(upload_to='profilepics', max_length=300, default='')

This "upload_to" folder, "profilepics", had the access permissions "755", but when I changed them by running "$ chmod -R 777 profilepics" in the terminal, everything worked! Strange that the error message was blaming it on my the "user_id" field being null. It was really just a folder permission for something entirely different. Hope that helps somebody, someday.

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