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I need help with this problem POUR1. I think it can be solved with bruteforce approach, but I read that it is a graph problem (BFS). I solved problems like ABCPATH, LABYR1, PT07Y, PT07Z, BITMAP, ...
But I don't know how to approach POUR1 in BFS manner.

Can someone give me some advice?

Problem statement:

Given two vessels, one of which can accommodate a litres of water and the other - b litres of water, determine the number of steps required to obtain exactly c litres of water in one of the vessels.

At the beginning both vessels are empty. The following operations are counted as 'steps':

  • emptying a vessel,
  • filling a vessel,
  • pouring water from one vessel to the other, without spilling, until one of the vessels is either full or empty.

Input:

An integer t, 1<=t<=100, denoting the number of testcases, followed by t sets of input data, each consisting of three positive integers a, b, c, not larger than 40000, given in separate lines.

Output:

For each set of input data, output the minimum number of steps required to obtain c litres, or -1 if this is impossible.

Example:

Sample input:

2
5
2
3
2
3
4

Sample output:

2
-1
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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Consider the set of all a priori possibles states (eg [3, 7] meaning Vessel1 contains 3 litters and vessel2 contains 7 litters). You have a directed graph whose vertices are those states and whose edges are the possible moves. The question is to find a path in the graph joining the state [0, 0] to either a state of type [c, ?] or a state of type [?, c]. Such a path is typically searched by a BFS.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that whenever one vessel is partially full, the other is completely empty or completely full, which reduces the overall number of states. Also note, a BFS will take time O(a+b) for vessel sizes a and b but an O(log a + log b) solution should be possible for this problem, using modular inverses – jwpat7 Jul 26 '13 at 5:11

This question has a simpler solution. No need for BFS. Ad-hoc would do good. method 1 - fill A, empty it into B. whenever A becomes empty fill it back, whenever B becomes full empty it. (all the above mentioned actions count as individual moves). Continue this process until you arrive at the required amount of water in any one of the vessels. Get the number of moves here. (say C1). method 2 - fill B, empty it into A. whenever B becomes empty fill it back, whenever A becomes full empty it. Continue this until you arrive at the required amount. Get the number of moves say C2). The answer is min(C1,C2). Source code in C++:

#include<cstdio>
#include<algorithm>
using namespace std;
int pour(int A,int B,int C){
int move=1,a=A,b=0,tfr;
while(a!=C && b!=C){
           tfr=min(a,B-b);
           b+=tfr;
           a-=tfr;
           move++;
           if(a==C || b==C)
                   break;
           if(a==0){
                    a=A;
                    move++;
           }
           if(b==B){
                b=0;
                move++;
           }
     }
     return move;
}
int gcd(int a,int b){
    if(b==0)
        return a;
    return gcd(b,a%b);
}
int main(){
int t,a,b,c;
scanf("%d",&t);
while(t--){
           scanf("%d%d%d",&a,&b,&c);
           if(c>a && c>b)
                  printf("-1\n");
           else if(c%gcd(a,b) != 0)
                printf("-1\n");
           else if(c==a || c==b)
                printf("1\n");
           else
               printf("%d\n",min(pour(a,b,c),pour(b,a,c)));
}
return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can you please explain the reason for calculating gcd ? – bornfree May 8 at 5:48

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