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Given a SQL table

Transactions
  ID            INT
  COMPANY_ID    INT
  STATUS        INT

where STATUS IN (0,1) indicates a free transaction and STATUS IN (2,3) indicates a billable transaction, what simple (I hope) ANSI SQL statement will show me, per COMPANY_ID, the number of billable transactions, non-billable transactions, and their ratio?

A conceptual prod in the right direction is fine if not a specific statement. My first attempts are to self-join on the table with WHERE clauses for the two status groups, but I'm stuck at how to get a column representing each distinct count so that I can compute the ratio.

This is conceptually very similar to summarize-aggregated-data but I'm not sure how to extend that question to this one.

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here is a start, I think this is along the right lines...The only thing left would be to add the ratio.

SELECT
    COMPANY_ID,
    NON_BILLABLE = SUM(CASE STATUS WHEN IN (0, 1) THEN 1 ELSE 0 END),
    BILLABLE = SUM(CASE STATUS WHEN IN (2, 3) THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)
FROM TRANSACTIONS
GROUP BY COMPANY_ID

EDIT: for standards compliance.

SELECT
    COMPANY_ID,
    SUM(CASE STATUS WHEN IN (0, 1) THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS NON_BILLABLE,
    SUM(CASE STATUS WHEN IN (2, 3) THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS BILLABLE
FROM TRANSACTIONS
GROUP BY COMPANY_ID
share|improve this answer
    
I guess SUM(CASE... END) AS BILLABLE is more standards compliant. – Dmitry Nov 24 '09 at 0:43
    
Ah, thanks. I'm a T-SQL guy. My bad. – Wil P Nov 24 '09 at 0:46
    
Thanks for this start. I'll try it out as soon as I get in tomorrow. – Eric J. Nov 24 '09 at 1:32
    
My actual DB is MySQL and I had to reverse the order of "STATUS" and "WHEN" for the query to work (using the Standards Compliant one) but then it works like a charm. – Eric J. Nov 24 '09 at 17:48

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