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I wrote a program which is supposed to behave like a for while loop, printing a string of text a certain number of times.

Here is the code:

global _start


    section .data

    msg db "Hello World!",10    ; define the message
    msgl equ $ - msg            ; define message length
                                ; use minimal size of storage space

    imax dd 0x00001000          ; defines imax to be big!

    section .text
_start:


    mov r8, 0x10          ; <s> put imax in r8d, this will be our 'i' </s>
                          ; just attempt 10 iterations
_loop_entry:                    ; loop entry point
    mov eax, 4                  ; setup the message to print
    mov ebx, 1                  ; write, stdout, message, length
    mov ecx, msg
    mov edx, msgl
    int 0x80                    ; print message
                                ; this is valid because registers do not change
    dec r8                      ; decrease i and jump on not zero
    cmp r8,1                    ; compare values to jump
    jnz _loop_entry


    mov rax, 1                  ; exit with zero
    mov rbx, 0
    int 0x80

The problem I have is the program runs into an infinite loop. I ran it inside gdb and the cause is:

int 0x80 is called to print the message, and this works correctly, however after the interrupt finishes, the contents of r8 is set to zero, rather than the value it should be. r8 is where the counter sits, counting (down) the number of times the string is printed.

Does int 0x80 modify register values? I noticed that rax, rbx, rcx, rdx were not affected in the same way.

Test Results

Answer: YES! It does modify r8.

I have changed two things in my program. Firstly I now cmp r8, 0, to get Hello World! the correct number of times, and

I have added

mov [i], r8                 ; put away i

After _loop_entry:

and also I have added

mov r8, [i]                 ; get i back

after the first int 0x80.

Here is my now working program. More info to come on performance against C++.

;
;   main.asm
; 
; 
;   To be used with main.asm, as a test to see if optimized c++
;   code can be beaten by me, writing a for / while loop myself. 
; 
; 


;  Absolute minimum code to be competative with asm.


global _start


    section .data

    msg db "Hello World!",10    ; define the message
    msgl equ $ - msg            ; define message length
                                ; use minimal size of storage space

    imax dd 0x00001000          ; defines imax to be big!
    i dd 0x0                    ; defines i

    section .text
_start:


    mov r8, 0x10          ; put imax in r8d, this will be our 'i'
_loop_entry:                    ; loop entry point
    mov [i], r8                 ; put away i
    mov eax, 4                  ; setup the message to print
    mov ebx, 1                  ; write, stdout, message, length
    mov ecx, msg
    mov edx, msgl
    int 0x80                    ; print message
                                ; this is valid because registers do not change
    mov r8, [i]                 ; get i back
    dec r8                      ; decrease i and jump on not zero
    cmp r8,0                    ; compare values to jump
    jnz _loop_entry


    mov rax, 1                  ; exit with zero
    mov rbx, 0
    int 0x80
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

int 0x80 just causes a software interrupt. In your case it's being used to make a system call. Whether or not any registers are affected will depend on the particular system call you're invoking and the system call calling convention of your platform. Read your documentation for the details.

Specifically, from the System V Application Binary Interface x86-64™ Architecture Processor Supplement [PDF link], Appendix A, x86-64 Linux Kernel Conventions:

The interface between the C library and the Linux kernel is the same as for the user-level applications...

For user-level applications, r8 is a scratch register, which means it's caller-saved. If you want it to be preserved over the system call, you'll need to do it yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, as a test, I will save and restore r8 to memory either side of int 0x80. I will update you –  user3728501 Jul 25 '13 at 22:50

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