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I have a Perl script that runs from a UNIX command prompt. The script asks several user inputs one of which is what ASCII document to gather specific data from. The script then reads the document and performs multiple checks of the document then outputs the specific data to another file.

The issue I'm having is that if I update the script, like adding – print “printprintprint\n\n”; inside the while () loop, the update “printprintprint” is not displayed in the UNIX window then next time I run the script. The only way for this or any change in the loop to take effect is to rename the script or move the script to another directory. If I renamed the script back to the original name, even if I made more changes to the script, the original output occurs and no “printprintprint” appears. I’ll try to provide a simple example: Name of script: doc_rpt.pl

my $action;
use strict;
use warnings;
while (<Infile>)
{
print “Perform action (Yes or No)?: “;
$action = <STDIN>;
chomp ($action);
    if (lc($action) ne “yes")
      {
        if (lc($action) ne “y”)
        {$action = “No”;}
        else
        {$action = “Yes”;}
       }
    else
        {$action = “Yes”;}
print “Result:  $action”;
}
close Infile;

If I were to run the script and answer “yes” the result displayed on the screen would be “Yes”. Now if I were to add print “printprintprint\n\n”;

my $action;
use strict;
use warnings;
while (<Infile>)
{
print “Perform action (Yes or No)?: “;
$action = <STDIN>;
        chomp ($action);
 print “printprintprint\n\n”;
    if (lc($action) ne “yes)
    {
        print “printprintprint\n\n”;
          if (lc($action) ne “y”)
          {
               print “printprintprint\n\n”;
               $action = “No”;
          }
        else
        {
              print “printprintprint\n\n”;
              $action = “Yes”;}
        }
    else
      {
          print “printprintprint\n\n”;
          $action = “Yes”;
      }
print “Result:  $action”;
}
close Infile;

After saving the changes, if I were to run the script again, I would not see “printprintprint” on the UNIX screen, no matter how many I create. I would have to rename the script (e.g. from doc_rpt.pl to doc_rpt_v2.pl) to have the changes take effect. This is also true with the if/else actions or any other actions in the loop. I would have to enter “yes” every time. “Yes” or “y” would result in a “No” value unless I renamed the script. Once the script is renamed to a name not used before, the script will run normally, that is until I make another change. Then the whole process repeats.

Looks like the original script and information read by the script is being left in a buffer and is not being emptied or overwritten. If this is the case, how do I empty the buffer? I do have Close Outfile and Close Infile. Should I use $| or something similar to empty the cache? Would the lack of an exit after “Close Infile;” be a reason?

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3  
I don't quite understand what you are trying to say. If you have some problem with your code, edit your question to include a small piece of code that reproduces the problem. See sscce for guidance. –  amon Jul 26 '13 at 0:02
    
Do you edit the script over a network? Try touching the script before running it. –  choroba Jul 26 '13 at 0:18
    
The script is located on a single server, but the compiler is mounted across the network on a SAN. “touch” did not work - thanks for the idea. –  user2620768 Jul 26 '13 at 16:48
1  
@user2620768 Is that your actual code? With the typographic quotes? And the missing closing quote at if (lc($action) ne “yes)? What is Infile? What software are you using to edit the script? What software to put it onto the server? –  amon Jul 26 '13 at 17:01
1  
after saving, does cat doc_rpt.pl show your changes? –  Chris Betti Jul 26 '13 at 17:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If doc_rpt.pl produces output from an old version of the script, but ./doc_rpt.pl's output reflects your changes, and renaming the script to doc_rpt2.pl and running it under that name also reflects your changes, then what's happening is:

  • Your $PATH value (echo $PATH to see it) contains ., the current directory. This isn't recommended on multi-user systems for somewhat historical security reasons, but is unlikely to be harmful in modern practice; on the other hand, it can produce quite confusing behavior, as you are rapidly discovering.
  • At some point in your $PATH before ., there is a directory which contains a copy of doc_rpt.pl, under that name, and which does not have the changes you're making.
  • When you run the script by just its bare name, i.e., doc_rpt.pl, the shell looks in the directories listed in $PATH for an executable file by that name. When it finds the older version of the script, it stops looking, and runs that version.
  • When you instead run the script by its name qualified with a path, i.e. ./doc_rpt.pl, the shell does not do a $PATH lookup; you've told it "run the executable file doc_rpt.pl which exists in my current working directory`, and that's what it does, which is why you see your recent changes when you do that.
  • Similarly, when you rename the script to doc_rpt2.pl and run it that way, the $PATH lookup continues until it reaches your current directory, whereupon it finds the executable file whose name you've given, and runs it.

The easiest way to solve the problem is simply to run the working version of the script as ./doc_rpt.pl in every case; if there's a copy of it somewhere else in $PATH, it's probably there for a reason.

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Thanks for the explanation. The script is located in both a development directory and an operational directory on two different networks. I suppose to avoid having everyone use ./ just for my script, I should overwrite the script in the operational directory once validated and run the script with ./ to read the updated script so it will run correctly for everyone else. Then just the script can be entered at the command prompt. Thanks again. –  user2620768 Jul 26 '13 at 18:22
    
@user2620768 That's...close enough to work, sure. –  Aaron Miller Jul 26 '13 at 18:53

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