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I'm writing a domain search app, I've kept it simple to just checking availability of a .com domain. the basics of it works fine, the problem is when I have multiple requests, specifically multiple search()'s it gives me an error of

 { [Error: connect Unknown system errno 37]
  code: 'Unknown system errno 37',
  errno: 'Unknown system errno 37',
  syscall: 'connect' }


 events.js:72
         throw er; // Unhandled 'error' event
          ^
 Error: connect Unknown system errno 37
     at errnoException (net.js:863:11)
     at connect (net.js:726:19)
     at net.js:804:9
     at asyncCallback (dns.js:68:16)
    at Object.onanswer [as oncomplete] (dns.js:121:9)

what do I need to change or add to make it work? eventing? queuing?

(edited for dc5)

var searches = ['test1', 'test2', 'test3'];

search(searches.shift()); 

function chkconnections(z) {
     if (connections <= 0) {
         if (searches.length >= 1) {
            process.nextTick(function() {
                 search(searches.shift());
            });
         }
     }
 }

 function search(x) {
      dotCom.connect(port, host, function() {
      dotCom.write('domain ' + x + '.com\r\n');
      count++;
      connections++;
 });

    dotCom.on('data', function(data) {
        c++;
        if (c == 2) { 
            dotComStatus = data.split('\n')[1];
            dotCom.on('close', function() {
                connections--;
                chkconnections();
                count--;
                if (dotComStatus.indexOf("No match for domain") > -1)
                {
                    console.log(x + ".com is available");
                } else {
                    console.log(x + ".com is taken");
                }
            });
        }
    });
}   
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The way your code is structured, you have a single socket and you are attempting to call connect on it four times in succession. That is the root of your problem.

Other issues: you are using variables that haven't been declared or initialized yet. Strict mode can help catch problems like these (note the "use strict"; addition at the top.

The data that is passed back is a buffer - you will need to convert it to a string before using string methods on it.

If you restructure your code, moving the new Socket and on('data') logic within the search method, you'll see a much better result.

Something like this:

"use strict";

var port = 43;
var net = require('net');
var host = 'whois.internic.net';

search('test');
search('test1');
search('test2');
search('test3');

function search(x) {
    var dotCom = new net.Socket();

    dotCom.connect(port, host, function() {
        dotCom.write('domain ' + x + '.com\r\n');
    });

    var c = 0;
    var dotComStatus;

    dotCom.on('data', function(data) {
        c++;
        if (c == 2) {
            dotComStatus = data.toString().split('\n')[1];
            dotCom.on('close', function() {
                if (dotComStatus.indexOf("No match for domain") > -1) {
                    console.log("available");
                } else {
                    console.log("taken");
                }
            });
        }
    });
}

With a slight change, the logic to be made to search in sequence by only initiating the next search once the first is complete.

"use strict";

var port = 43;
var net = require('net');
var host = 'whois.internic.net';

var searches = [
    "test",
    "test1",
    "test2",
    "test3"
];


function search(x) {
    var dotCom = new net.Socket();

    dotCom.connect(port, host, function() {
        dotCom.write('domain ' + x + '.com\r\n');
    });

    var c = 0;
    var dotComStatus;

    dotCom.on('data', function(data) {
        c++;
        if (c == 2) {
            dotComStatus = data.toString().split('\n')[1];
            dotCom.on('close', function() {
                if (dotComStatus.indexOf("No match for domain") > -1) {
                    console.log("available");
                } else {
                    console.log("taken");
                }

                if(searches.length === 0) return;

                process.nextTick(function() {
                    search(searches.shift()); 
                });
            });
        }
    });
}

search(searches.shift());

If you want to search multiple TLD's for each second level domain you could do something like:

var tlds = ['.net', '.com', '.org'];
var names = ['test', 'test1', 'test2'];

for(var i = 0; i < names.length; ++i) {
    for(var j = 0; j < tlds.length; ++j) {
        search(names[i] + tlds[j]);
    }
}

and modify your search function to accept this type of parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
if I add in a .connect for .net and .org within the search function, making it three connections per run of the function and I have more than one search, it throws a Error: read ECONNRESET. what would be the best practice to resolve this? – archytect Jul 26 '13 at 5:16
    
There's probably many different ways to do it. One simple approach would be to put the queries in an array, then on completion call search(arr. shift()) until the array is empty. (see updated code) – dc5 Jul 26 '13 at 5:24
    
That last comment was in answer to the question before you edited. Not sure what your code looked like when you tried that, but it sounds like you just put it into the state it was in before (or similar). There's not need to try to do more work within the search function. refactor the code a bit so you can call the search function with different top level domains. – dc5 Jul 26 '13 at 7:13
    
I've updated the original post's code. process.nextTick() was what I was looking for all along. but your example you have that within the closing of the socket. how would I refactor that if the function itself handles three sockets? – archytect Jul 26 '13 at 18:02
    
A couple of suggestions: 1. If you want to have three requests outstanding at a time, you will need a way to start the requests and a way to keep track of when they have completed (think callback). 2. Decide if you want to return results as they come in or wait until they are all complete. 3. think of any other use cases you might want to handle. 4. Think about how you can make the code more DRY (i.e.: reduce the repetition). There are many ways to structure a solution, play around with a few and see what works for your style. – dc5 Jul 26 '13 at 23:02

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