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I've solvde the problem nuggets on usaco. I came to a point that I needed to prove that:

If we have a set S that contain numbers (0,1,2,3,...P-1) where P is a prime number. If we multiplied this set * X [where X and P are co-primes (relative primes)] we will get the same set S, maybe with different arrangement, but we will get the same elements. After multiplication we will take mod P for each element in the set.

Is that any theorem, or can it be proof related to this?

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Your question is unclear. You multiply set by X and claim it's unchanged which is untrue obviously... Please clarify. –  sashkello Jul 26 '13 at 1:05
    
sorry, I made a mistake .. I forgot to say that after multiplication we will take mod P for each element in the set - now updated with an example –  Merna Jul 26 '13 at 1:09
    
For future reference, this question makes a lot more sense on math.stackexchange –  roliu Jul 26 '13 at 9:17
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This question belongs on math.stackexchange.com. –  andand Jul 26 '13 at 18:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

suppose, there are i and j in (0,1,2,3,...P-1) which yield same value for lambda a: (a*x)%p.

then

i*x = j*x mod p
=> i*x - j*x = 0 mod p
=> (i - j)*x = 0 mod p

so p divides (i-j)*x. now p and x are co prime, so p does not divide x. So p | i - j

Now notice, i and j both are less than p. so i - j also less than p. So p can not divide i - j unless, it is zero. So i - j = 0 => i = j.

So if i and j yields same, i = j. So when i != j, i and j yield different integers. So for each i in (0,1,2,3,...P-1), lambda a: (a*x)%p yields different integer. So if you collect the integer in a set, the set must have p elements. But all the integers must be less than p. So the set contains each elements from (0,1,2,...P-1).


Remark : p does not necessarily need to be prime. All it takes, p and x to be co prime.

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thank you a lot :) ! –  Merna Jul 26 '13 at 12:37
    
about your Remark ... You said Now notice, i and j both are less than p. so i - j also less than p. So p can not divide i - j unless, it is zero. doesn't that mean that p HAS TO be prime? because if not .. p may divide i-j ? –  Merna Jul 26 '13 at 12:48
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@Merna no, it is not i - j divides p, it is if p divides i - j. If a | b, then a <= b. so p | i - j implies p <= i - j. but i - j < p ! So contradiction ! –  rnbcoder Jul 26 '13 at 14:37
    
thank a lot @rnbcoder –  Merna Jul 26 '13 at 16:44

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