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I need to query different tables that have the same columns but different content.

Table A:

ID   DocDate     Type
1   2013-05-01    A
2   2013-05-01    B
3   2013-05-02    D
4   2013-05-04    D

Table B:

ID   DocDate     Type
1   2013-05-01    F
2   2013-05-03    G
3   2013-05-03    G
4   2013-05-05    H

What I need:

COUNT(Tablea.ID)  COUNT(Tableb.ID) DocDate
      2                   1      2013-05-01
      1                  NULL    2013-05-02
     NULL                 2      2013-05-03
      1                  NULL    2013-05-04
     NULL                 1      2013-05-05

Any help would be really appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
In one query? if so, what is the relation between them? – Hanky Panky Jul 26 '13 at 4:00
1  
Can you show us the query you have tried? – Adriaan Stander Jul 26 '13 at 4:00
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try

SELECT d.docdate, a.total totala, b.total totalb
  FROM
(
  SELECT docdate 
    FROM tablea
   UNION
  SELECT docdate 
    FROM tableb
) d LEFT JOIN 
(
  SELECT docdate, COUNT(*) total
    FROM tablea
   GROUP BY docdate
) a ON d.docdate = a.docdate LEFT JOIN
(
  SELECT docdate, COUNT(*) total
    FROM tableb
   GROUP BY docdate
) b ON d.docdate = b.docdate
 ORDER BY d.docdate

Output:

|    DOCDATE | TOTALA | TOTALB |
--------------------------------
| 2013-05-01 |      2 |      1 |
| 2013-05-02 |      1 | (null) |
| 2013-05-03 | (null) |      2 |
| 2013-05-04 |      1 | (null) |
| 2013-05-05 | (null) |      1 |

Here is SQLFiddle demo

share|improve this answer

There are a couple of ways to get this result.

The most efficient query to return the specified rows is likely going to be:

SELECT NULLIF(SUM(c.cnt_a_id),0) AS cnt_a_id
     , NULLIF(SUM(c.cnt_b_id),0) AS cnt_b_id
     , c.DocDate
  FROM (
         SELECT COUNT(a.ID) AS cnt_a_id
              , 0           AS cnt_b_id 
              , a.DocDate   AS DocDate
           FROM Table_A a
          GROUP BY a.DocDate
          UNION ALL
         SELECT 0
              , COUNT(b.ID)
              , b.DocDate
           FROM Table_B b
          GROUP BY b.DocDate
       ) c
 GROUP BY c.DocDate

Suitable covering indexes on (DocDate, ID) of each table will benefit performance on large sets.

Another simpler to understand, but more expensive, would be create the UNION of the tables, and then perform the GROUP BY.

SELECT NULLIF(COUNT(c.a_id)) AS cnt_a_id
     , NULLIF(COUNT(c.b_id)) AS cnt_b_id
     , c.DocDate
  FROM (
         SELECT a.ID       AS a_id
              , NULL + 0   AS b_id
              , a.DocDate  AS DocDate
           FROM Table_A a
          UNION ALL
         SELECT NULL + 0   AS a_id
              , b.ID       AS b_id
              , b.DocDate  AS DocDate
           FROM Table_B b
       ) c
 GROUP BY c.DocDate

(This second query is less efficient, because of the way MySQL materializes the query in the inline view as a temporary MyISAM table; this second query basically creates a copy of Table_A and Table_B concatenated together, and runs a query against that.

The first query is little different, in that it produces smaller sets to be concatenated together.

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